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Only An Actual Grammar Genius Will Totally Ace This Quiz

Is it "nip it in the butt" or "nip it in the bud"?

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  1. Which is the correct phrase?

    Correct
    Incorrect
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    People often mistake "could have" for "could of" just because of pronunciation. But nah, the correct phrase is "could have."

  2. Pick the correct phrase.

    Correct
    Incorrect
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    "I could care less" denotes that you actually care a little bit. You PROBABLY meant "I couldn't care less," because that means you don't care at all.

  3. Which is the correct phrase?

    Correct
    Incorrect
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    While "nip it in the butt" conjures a funny image, "nip it in the bud" is actually the correct phrase.

  4. Which is correct?

    Correct
    Incorrect
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    "One and the same" means that two things are the same, whereas "one in the same" doesn't actually mean much of anything.

  5. Which is the correct phrase?

    Correct
    Incorrect
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    This phrase means you're covering ALL possibilities. "Intensive purposes" means you're covering "strong purposes," which is not a thing.

  6. Which is correct?

    Correct
    Incorrect
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    You do things "on purpose" and "by accident."

  7. Pick the correct phrase.

    Correct
    Incorrect
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    We're guessing you meant that someone changed entirely (180 degrees), not that they changed and then went back exactly to the way they were (which would be 360 degrees, or a full circle).

  8. Choose the correct phrase.

    Correct
    Incorrect
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    "Toe the line" means to step up to the edge of the line, aka to put your toes on the line.

  9. How about this one?

    Correct
    Incorrect
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    "Tongue in cheek" means to be saying something in humor or without really meaning it. "Tongue and cheek" is literally just that — tongue and cheek.

  10. Pick the correct phrase.

    Correct
    Incorrect
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Somewhere out there, there might exist an actual physical "statue of limitations," a monument devoted to limitations, but probably not. The correct phrase is "statute of limitations," referring to a "period of limitation for the bringing of certain kinds of legal action."

  11. Choose the correct phrase.

    Correct
    Incorrect
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    To be "waiting with baited breath" refers to "bait," as in "bait and tackle." As in fish. As in, you'd have fish breath. Which would be WEIRD. "Bated breath" means breath that's shortened and excited.

  12. Which is the correct phrase?

    Correct
    Incorrect
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    "Momento" isn't actually a word in the English language. Sorry!

  13. Pick the correct phrase?

    Correct
    Incorrect
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    When you "extract," you're taking something out of something else. When you "exact," you're enacting an action onto something else.

  14. Which is the right phrase?

    Correct
    Incorrect
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Though it sounds like it's a reference to a Scottish person, "scot-free" is actually derived from the 16th-century term "shot-free," which means "not required to pay a tax or fee."

  15. Last one! Is it:

    Correct
    Incorrect
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    LOL.

 
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