back to top

16 Things You Definitely Shouldn't Wear To Coachella

Bad idea.

There are a lot of questionable fashion choices at Coachella.

Mark Davis / Getty Images

It's a festival. You can expect people to be dressing like yeti space fairies.

Kevin Winter / Getty Images

And wearing generally regrettable things.

HELLO MANKINI.
Mark Davis / Getty Images

HELLO MANKINI.

Hey, you do you.

Mark Davis / Getty Images
Advertisement

But you should definitely, at all costs, not being doing any of this:

Mark Davis / Getty Images

No.

Mark Davis / Getty Images

No.

Mark Davis / Getty Images

No.

Charles Gallay / Getty Images
Advertisement

Nope.

Frazer Harrison / Getty Images

Nah, son.

Karl Walter / Getty Images

Nooooooo.

Ahem, Vanessa Hudgens.
Tiffany Rose/Wireimage

Ahem, Vanessa Hudgens.

Nuh-uh.

Mark Davis / Getty Images
Advertisement

Nopers.

Mark Davis / Getty Images

Hell no.

Charles Gallay / Getty Images

No way.

Frazer Harrison / Getty Images

NO.

Charles Gallay / Getty Images
Advertisement

Holy crap, NO.

Charles Gallay / Getty Images

Nooooooo.

Charles Gallay / Getty Images

Seriously, no.

Charles Gallay / Getty Images

And if you're still unclear why wearing headdresses is messed up:

This brilliant essay on the website Native Appropriations breaks it down nicely. Explains blogger Adrienne K., "The image of a warbonnet and warpaint wearing Indian is one that has been created and perpetuated by Hollywood and only bears minimal resemblance to traditional regalia of Plains tribes. It furthers the stereotype that Native peoples are one monolithic culture, when in fact there are 500+ distinct tribes with their own cultures. It also places Native people in the historic past, as something that cannot exist in modern society. We don't walk around in ceremonial attire everyday, but we still exist and are still Native."And also, says Adrienne, "“Playing Indian” has a long history in the United States, all the way back to those original tea partiers in Boston, and in no way is it better than minstral shows or dressing up in blackface. You are pretending to be a race that you are not, and are drawing upon stereotypes to do so. "
Michael Tullberg / Getty Images

This brilliant essay on the website Native Appropriations breaks it down nicely.

Explains blogger Adrienne K., "The image of a warbonnet and warpaint wearing Indian is one that has been created and perpetuated by Hollywood and only bears minimal resemblance to traditional regalia of Plains tribes. It furthers the stereotype that Native peoples are one monolithic culture, when in fact there are 500+ distinct tribes with their own cultures. It also places Native people in the historic past, as something that cannot exist in modern society. We don't walk around in ceremonial attire everyday, but we still exist and are still Native."

And also, says Adrienne, "“Playing Indian” has a long history in the United States, all the way back to those original tea partiers in Boston, and in no way is it better than minstral shows or dressing up in blackface. You are pretending to be a race that you are not, and are drawing upon stereotypes to do so. "

That goes for you, too, Kardashians.

Connect with As/Is