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How Much Do Brands Control Your Brain?

The new book The Sonic Boom takes a smart look at the world we experience through our ears. See which brands own your ears by taking this quiz.

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1.

w.soundcloud.com
  1. What is this jaunty tune helping to sell?

    Car loans
    Thinkstock
    Car loans
    Thinkstock
    Canned soups
    Thinkstock
    Canned soups
    Thinkstock
    Roofing supplies
    Thinkstock
    Roofing supplies
    Thinkstock
    A bank
    Thinkstock
    A bank
    Thinkstock
    Insurance
    Thinkstock
    Insurance
    Thinkstock
    BuzzFeed dot com, the website
    LOL
    BuzzFeed dot com, the website
    LOL
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Farmer's Insurance

    It's the little song that immediately conjures the image of J.K. Simmons' cue ball head.

    Farmer's Insurance
    Farmer's Insurance

How Much Do Brands Control Your Brain?

2.

w.soundcloud.com
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  1. What company sounds like this?

    Thinkstock
    Nike
    Sprint
    Sprite
    AT&T
    AOL
    Microsoft
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    AT&T

    Purposeful, curious and open are the ideals that inspired Joel Beckerman to put together those four little notes, which were distilled down from an initial "anthem" written to represent the brand.

    AT&T
    AT&T

How Much Do Brands Control Your Brain?

3.

w.soundcloud.com
  1. Which delicious soft drink sounds like this?

    Pepsi
    Thinkstock
    Pepsi
    Thinkstock
    Dr. Pepper
    Flickr / Via Flickr: poolie
    Dr. Pepper
    Flickr / Via Flickr: poolie
    Coca-Cola
    Getty Images News / Scott Olson / Via Thinkstock
    Coca-Cola
    Getty Images News / Scott Olson / Via Thinkstock
    Mountain Dew
    Flickr / Via Flickr: thomashawk
    Mountain Dew
    Flickr / Via Flickr: thomashawk
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Coca-Cola

    That friendly little whistle is the sound of your blood sugar going up while the Dark Overlords of the soda world take over your brain.

    Coca-Cola
    komikler.com

How Much Do Brands Control Your Brain?

4.

w.soundcloud.com
  1. What does this company make?

    Computers
    iStock / Via Thinkstock
    Computers
    iStock / Via Thinkstock
    Sound systems
    Flickr / Via Flickr: rorobito
    Sound systems
    Flickr / Via Flickr: rorobito
    Cameras
    Alexander Bedrin / Thinkstock
    Cameras
    Alexander Bedrin / Thinkstock
    Batteries
    Gudella / Thinkstock
    Batteries
    Gudella / Thinkstock
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Duracell Batteries

    Duracell was actually the first battery company to use a (super creepy) pink bunny to advertise their product, in 1973. Why the bunnies are pink and how they are related to alkaline power products is anyone's guess.

    Duracell Batteries
    Duracell

How Much Do Brands Control Your Brain?

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5.

w.soundcloud.com
  1. Which of these shows starts after this sound?

    Californication
    Californication
    Mad Men
    Mad Men
    The Walking Dead
    The Walking Dead
    The Newsroom
    The Newsroom
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    The Newsroom/HBO

    You may know that snowy TV + "aaaaah" sound from the time you stole your ex's grandma's HBO Go login and became one with your couch.

    The Newsroom/HBO
    HBO

How Much Do Brands Control Your Brain?

6.

w.soundcloud.com
  1. Where would you find the product associated with this sound?

    Inside your computer
    Thinkstock
    Inside your computer
    Thinkstock
    Inside your car
    Thinkstock
    Inside your car
    Thinkstock
    Inside your shoes
    Thinkstock
    Inside your shoes
    Thinkstock
    Inside your sandwich
    Thinkstock
    Inside your sandwich
    Thinkstock
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Inside your computer/Intel Inside

    The four note sonic logo for Intel Inside is widely considered one of the most prevailing instances of sonic branding gone right. It was composed by Walter Werzowa, whose other major hit is a song called "Bring Me Edelweiss" lol.

    Inside your computer/Intel Inside
    Intel

How Much Do Brands Control Your Brain?

7.

w.soundcloud.com
Advertisement
  1. Which of these shows is *not* related to this sound?

    Friends
    Friends
    Parks and Rec
    Parks and Rec
    Parenthood
    Parenthood
    2 Broke Girls
    2 Broke Girls
    Late Night with Seth Meyers
    Late Night with Seth Meyers
    Saturday Night Live
    Saturday Night Live
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    2 Broke Girls/NBC

    The NBC three-note chime was introduced in 1929 as a station identification and has stuck around since then, which explains why it's one of the most enduring earworms known to the human race.

    2 Broke Girls/NBC
    NBC

How Much Do Brands Control Your Brain?

8.

w.soundcloud.com
  1. What is this cheery whistling tune trying to sell you?

    Fast Food
    Thinkstock
    Fast Food
    Thinkstock
    Pizza
    Thinkstock
    Pizza
    Thinkstock
    Bargain fashion
    Thinkstock
    Bargain fashion
    Thinkstock
    Deodorant
    Thinkstock
    Deodorant
    Thinkstock
    Toothpaste
    Thinkstock
    Toothpaste
    Thinkstock
    Candy
    Thinkstock
    Candy
    Thinkstock
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Deodorant/Old Spice

    That little whistling tune is what you hear if you're watching an Old Spice commercial because whistling is the natural mating call of the sexy shirtless man.

    Deodorant/Old Spice
    Old Spice

How Much Do Brands Control Your Brain?

9.

w.soundcloud.com
  1. What comes after this sound?

    A video game
    Thinkstock
    A video game
    Thinkstock
    A movie
    Thinkstock
    A movie
    Thinkstock
    A TV show
    Thinkstock
    A TV show
    Thinkstock
    A commercial
    Thinkstock
    A commercial
    Thinkstock
    A play
    Thinkstock
    A play
    Thinkstock
    An awards show
    Thinkstock
    An awards show
    Thinkstock
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    A movie/THX

    That revving sound is called "Deep Note" and it was composed by honorary Jedi/sound engineer James A. Moorer (pictured). It premiered in 1983 at a screening of "Return of the Jedi."

    A movie/THX
    THX

How Much Do Brands Control Your Brain?

10. Are you completely brainwashed or are your ears only attuned to the sound of artisanal ukelele played by a musician nobody has heard of? Share in the comments!

The Sonic Boom: How Sound Transforms the Way We Think, Feel, And Buy is available here. Direct any complaints for humming these sounds to co-authors Joel Beckerman and Tyler Gray. ;)

Julia Furlan is an audio editor for BuzzFeed News and is based in New York.

Contact Julia Furlan at julia.furlan@buzzfeed.com.

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