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How Far Would You Make It On "Top Chef"?

Please pack your knives and go.

Posted on

There's only one problem: you're not an actual chef...

Bravo

You weren't completely honest about your cooking experience during the interview process, but now that you've been picked for the season, you really want that $125,000 cash prize.

For each question, pick the best answer to help you survive the first challenge. Good luck!

  1. You draw a knife to see which cut of pork you have to cook. You get:<br />PORK BUTT<br />Where on the pig does pork butt come from?<br />
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    Correct
    Incorrect
    The butt, duh
    Correct
    Incorrect
    The legs
    Correct
    Incorrect
    The shoulder
    Correct
    Incorrect
    The belly
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Despite the name, pork butt comes from the shoulder of a pig.

    Also called Boston butt or pork shoulder, this cut of pork is inexpensive, flavorful, and easy to work with. (You got lucky with this cut of pork!)

    Despite the name, pork butt comes from the shoulder of a pig.
    Via Bravo
  2. And how should you cook it?
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    Correct
    Incorrect
    Quickly cook it in a hot pan
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Cook it in a pressure cooker
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Poach it
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Deep-fry it
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    You better cook that baby in a pressure cooker.

    The only drawback to getting assigned pork butt is that it takes a very long time to cook ― but you don't have that kinda time! Better bust out that pressure cooker.

    You better cook that baby in a pressure cooker.
    Via Bravo
  3. You decide to make polenta to go with your pork. Which pantry staple do you grab?
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    Correct
    Incorrect
    Cornmeal
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Arborio rice
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Pasta
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Farro
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    To make polenta, you need to grab cornmeal.

    Polenta is just a fancy name for boiled cornmeal (AKA grits).

    To make polenta, you need to grab cornmeal.
    Via Bravo
  4. You have limited time here, so how long are you planning to cook that polenta for?
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    Correct
    Incorrect
    About 5 minutes
    Correct
    Incorrect
    About 10 minutes
    Correct
    Incorrect
    About 15 minutes
    Correct
    Incorrect
    About 30 minutes
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Polenta takes about 30 minutes to cook.

    Cornmeal takes a while to soften, but getting that perfectly soft polenta will surely impress Tom and Gail.

    Polenta takes about 30 minutes to cook.
    Via imgflip.com
  5. Your polenta tastes bland, so you decide to add blue cheese to them. In the fridge are four types of cheese. Which one do you pick?
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    Correct
    Incorrect
    Brie
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Gorgonzola
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Provolone
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Camembert
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    If you're looking for blue cheese, grab the gorgonzola.

    It's a crumbly, salty variety of blue cheese made from unskimmed cow's milk that will go perfect with your polenta.

    If you're looking for blue cheese, grab the gorgonzola.
    Via Bravo
  6. You check on your pork and it looks beautiful, but the bottom of the pot has tiny burnt bits stuck to it (nothing major). What are these brown bits called?
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    Correct
    Incorrect
    Remoulage
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Cocotte
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Fond
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Fool
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    The burnt bits on the bottom of the pot are called fond.

    They're super flavorful and take your sauce to the next level. If you let them go to waste, Padma will surely call you out for it.

    The burnt bits on the bottom of the pot are called fond. Tap to play GIF Tap to play GIF
    Via Bravo
  7. You heat up the pot and add wine to remove the burnt bits. What is this technique called?
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    Correct
    Incorrect
    Sweating
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Plumping
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Shocking
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Deglazing
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Deglazing is the act of removing the flavorful brown bits on the bottom of a pan.

    The fond dissolves in the deglazing liquid (usually wine) and adds a depth of flavor to sauces.

    Deglazing is the act of removing the flavorful brown bits on the bottom of a pan.
    Via Bravo
  8. You're doing good! Your pork is ready, your wine sauce is flavorful, and your polenta is creamy. The last component you need is a veggie. Which of these would cook the fastest?
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    Correct
    Incorrect
    Swiss chard
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Sweet potatoes
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Celery root
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Beets
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    If you're pressed for time, go with the Swiss chard.

    Quickly sauté it in a hot pan and you'll be good to go!

    If you're pressed for time, go with the Swiss chard.
    Via Bravo
  9. What about the stems? What do you do with them?
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    Correct
    Incorrect
    Sauté them first before adding the leaves
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Add them after you sauté the leaves
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Sauté the leaves and stems at the same time
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Throw them out, they're too tough
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    You should definitely save the stems ― just make sure to sauté them for a few minutes before adding the leaves.

    The stems add color and texture to the chard and throwing them out is a guaranteed way to upset the judges.

    You should definitely save the stems ― just make sure to sauté them for a few minutes before adding the leaves.
    Via imgflip.com
  10. ONE MINUTE LEFT:<br />You notice that your dish is underseasoned, but you already plated it. Which salt is best for sprinkling on top?
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    Correct
    Incorrect
    Iodized salt
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Flake salt
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Kosher salt
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Table salt
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Flake salt is most commonly used to finish dishes.

    The flakey texture adds a nice crunch to composed dishes and the judges will think you did it on purpose.

    Flake salt is most commonly used to finish dishes. Tap to play GIF Tap to play GIF
    Via Bravo
 
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