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Texas Trooper Charged In Sandra Bland Case To Appeal Termination

State trooper Brian Encinia was indicted by a grand jury for allegedly lying in a report about how the arrest unfolded in July. He turned himself in Thursday and was released on $2,500 bond.

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The Texas state trooper charged with perjury in the arrest of Sandra Bland surrendered Thursday to authorities.

State trooper Brian Encinia was indicted by a grand jury Wednesday for allegedly lying in a report about how the arrest unfolded in July. He turned himself in Thursday at Waller County Jail and posted the $2,500 bond one hour later.

A day earlier, the Texas Department of Public Safety announced that termination proceedings to discharge Encinia would begin after he was charged with perjury.

Encinia's attorney, Larkin Eakin, said that his client's termination is unwarranted and will appeal the decision, according to the Associated Press.

Bland's death gained national attention after police dashcam taken on July 10 showed she became confrontational with Encinia, who arrested the Black Lives Matter activist on suspicion of assault on a public servant.

Bland, who had been pulled over for allegedly failing to signal a lane change, was found dead in her jail call three days later, hanging from a trash bag.

The video footage and apparent signs that she was suicidal caused uproar, prompting calls by public officials for inquiries into what happened.

In December, a grand jury decided no one at Waller County Jail would be indicted for the death of the 28-year-old, who medical examiners had determined committed suicide.

However, the Walter County grand jury continued its examination into the case.

The charge reached on Wednesday is related to how Encinia allegedly lied about how he pulled Bland from her car, the Houston Chronicle reported.

Records related to the case, including Encinia's report, have not been released due to the ongoing investigation.

The grand jury indictment came on the same day an attorney for the Bland family told the Los Angeles Times hopes of a charge coming out of the deliberations were low.

“We would frankly be surprised,” Cannon Lambert said.

Sheriff's deputies could be seen lined up outside the courthouse to protect grand jury members after they made their decision Wednesday.

Darrell Jordan, a special prosecutor, told the Chronicle that if Encinia is ultimately convicted of the misdemeanor perjury charge, he could face up to a year in jail and a $4,000 fine.

Jason Wells is a news editor for BuzzFeed News and is based in Los Angeles.

Contact Jason Wells at jason.wells@buzzfeed.com.

Jon Passantino is a deputy news director for BuzzFeed News and is based in Los Angeles.

Contact Jon Passantino at jonathan.passantino@buzzfeed.com.

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