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Can You Guess Which Famous Writer Created These Words?

Everybody's heard about the word! A word, word, word, etymology's the word!

  1. chortle

    Correct! 
    Wrong! 

    It's Lewis Carroll!

    From Through the Looking-Glass: and What Alice Found There: "‘O frabjous day! Callooh! Callay!’ He chortled in his joy."

  2. superman

    Correct! 
    Wrong! 

    It's Nietzsche!

    "Superman" is a translation of "Übermensch" — from Nietzsche's Also sprach Zarathustra.

  3. compunctious

    Correct! 
    Wrong! 

    It's Shakespeare!

    From Macbeth: "Stop vp th'accesse, and passage to Remorse, That no compunctious visitings of Nature Shake my fell purpose."

  4. whizbang

    Correct! 
    Wrong! 

    It's Dickens!

    From The Pickwick Papers: "Fired a musket..rushed into wine shop..back again—whiz, bang."

  5. factoid

    Correct! 
    Wrong! 

    It's Norman Mailer!

    From his biography of Marilyn Monroe, Marilyn: "Factoids..that is, facts which have no existence before appearing in a magazine or newspaper, creations which are not so much lies as a product to manipulate emotion in the Silent Majority."

  6. piehole

    Correct! 
    Wrong! 

    It's Stephen King!

    From Christine: "Then shut your pie-hole."

  7. boredom

    Correct! 
    Wrong! 

    It's Dickens!

    From Bleak House: "chronic malady of boredom."

  8. yahoo

    Correct! 
    Wrong! 

    It's Jonathan Swift!

    From Gulliver's Travels: "The Fore-feet of the Yahoo differed from my Hands in nothing else, but the Length of the Nails, the Coarseness and Brownness of the Palms, and the Hairiness on the Backs."

  9. pandemonium

    Correct! 
    Wrong! 

    It's Milton!

    From Paradise Lost: "A solemn Councel forthwith to be held At Pandæmonium, the high Capital Of Satan and his Peers" and "About the walls Of Pandæmonium, Citie and proud seate Of Lucifer."

  10. meme

    Correct! 
    Wrong! 

    It's Dawkins!

    From The Selfish Gene: "We need a name for the new replicator, a noun which conveys the idea of a unit of cultural transmission, or a unit of imitation. ‘Mimeme’ comes from a suitable Greek root, but I want a monosyllable that sounds a bit like ‘gene’. I hope my classicist friends will forgive me if I abbreviate mimeme to meme... It should be pronounced to rhyme with ‘cream’. Examples of memes are tunes, ideas, catch-phrases, clothes fashions, ways of making pots or of building arches."

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