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This Is What You Need To Know About That Final Scene Of "Mad Men"

"I'd like to buy the world a Coke..." WARNING: SPOILERS AHEAD!

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WARNING: DO NOT READ ON IF YOU HAVE NOT SEEN THE SERIES FINALE OF MAD MEN.

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Like the one who told Don at Esalen that he could go when he pleases.

So "ding", Don gets an idea and goes back to make the Coke Ad? #MadMadFinale

Mad Men costume designer Janie Bryant appreciated that fans noticed.

.@MyLifeInPlastic Not a #coincidence thank you for noticing 💋 https://t.co/RSSfCBpPq6

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Though many were confused about the final scene, some pointed out that Don's lightbulb moment indicates he uses his experiences at Esalen to go back to New York, pitch McCann his brilliant idea, and reclaim his place in the world.

Bwah ha ha ha ha ha. So Don obviously goes back to McCann, because Coke's "I'd Like To Be a Hippie Death Cult on a Hill" bowed in 1971.

Kind of surprised so many missed Don's ending. He went back to McCann & did the Coke ad based on his experience. He's a lifer. #MadMen

I'm going to assume that Don went back to McCann and made that Coke commercial. Anyone else? #MadMen #MadManFinale

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Don finds inner peace, comes back to NY to finally make something of himself...with the Coke ad. I think... #MadMenFinale

Vox Media's Eileen Sutton and Todd VanDerWerff actually predicted the Coke connection after last week's episode.

AMC

"In talking with Eileen Sutton, a colleague from our Vox Media sister publication Racked who first pointed this out to me, I've come to realize that Mad Men is coming up on a very famous anniversary in advertising," VanDerWerff wrote on May 12. "It explains the season's obsession with Coca-Cola (which turns up even in this episode, in the form of the broken Coke machine). It explains the season's obsession with connection. And it explains the long, long wait we've had for a vintage Don Draper pitch. (By my count, we haven't gotten one since the sixth-season finale, which was the Hershey's pitch that lost Don his job.)"

And the iconic 1971 Coke ad really did come from McCann.

View this video on YouTube

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When Bill Backer, McCann's creative director on the Coke account, was flying to London to write radio commercials with two successful British songwriters, heavy fog forced the plan to land in Ireland. Though passengers were at first unhappy, they bonded over the shared travel experienced over bottles of Coke in the airport café, inspiring Backer.