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People Are Sharing A Photo Of Woodstock And Claiming It Shows The North Dakota Pipeline Protest

It's a hoax, folks.

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A viral Facebook prank has convinced a lot of people that this photo shows the anti-pipeline protest in North Dakota. It's a hoax.

Tyler Eldridge / Facebook / Via Facebook: tyler.eldridge.9

Facebook user Tyler Eldridge shared the photo on his account this week. "This is why the media won't show the protest on the pipeline," he wrote, adding the hashtag "StayAware."

The photo has been shared more than 350,000 times, persuading many people that the scale of the protest is not being properly covered in the media.

What the photo actually shows is the iconic Woodstock music festival in 1969.

Barry Z Levine / Getty Images

The photo, taken by photographer Barry Z. Levine, shows a massive crowd from the festival that drew some 400,000 attendees.

The protest in North Dakota — spurred by the Standing Rock Sioux Nation's opposition to a proposed oil pipeline that they say could poison nearby rivers — has drawn thousands of protesters from across North America. But it's nothing close to the number that attended Woodstock.

Eldridge's post is tagged with a fake business page on Facebook called "Pipeline! North Dakota" which may have contributed to its spread.

Tyler Eldridge / Facebook

Another clue that Elridge is trolling is in the location of his post, which is set to Woodstock, New York.

Eldridge copped to the hoax in the comments on his photo. "I made the news for a viral hoax picture of the protest lol," he wrote.

Tyler Eldridge / Facebook

BuzzFeed News reached out to Eldridge for comment. We will update this post when we hear back.

For the record, here are some photos from the actual encampment in North Dakota.

Ishmael Daro is a social news editor for BuzzFeed and is based in Toronto.

Contact Ishmael N. Daro at ishmael.daro@buzzfeed.com.

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