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A biracial girl at a PWI.

I am surrounded by Caucasian teachers.

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Does race matter in the education system?

I attend a PWI, which means it is a predominately white institute. I knew this whenever I applied to come to my school. However, it wasn't something that was a deal breaker for me. I was focused on finding a school that I loved, that had an in-state tuition price. As my journey at my undergrad ends, I think how attending a PWI may have had any influence on me in comparison if I would have gone to an HBCU. An HBCU is a historically black college or university. Many African-Americans chose to go to these institutes instead of a PWI, for a lot of different personal reasons. You have to understand from my perspective I am biracial, so I relate to the idea of a PWI or an HBCU differently, to me I share both aspects of the institutions that might be appealing to others.Yes, when attending a PWI the diversity factor may not be as high; but the PWI that I attended gave opportunities to include yourself in diversity if you choose too. Yes, a majority of the professor at my school are of Caucasian decent, but over the past four years, I have seen the diversity increase by some measures.My point of this post is still that college is what you make of it and the experiences that you decided to involve yourself in. You also chose who you hang around and decide to become friends within your college career. You decide what professors you feel like you have a connection with or favor. I do understand the importance of diversity, because you may relate to someone's experiences more than other dues to their racial background. We as humans want to be comfortable with the people around us. However, at the same time, we are all human and some of us do share the same idea of life and beliefs regardless of our skin color. It is about our experiences and our opinions, not the pigment of our skin that brings us together.
Pixabay / Via pixabay.com

I attend a PWI, which means it is a predominately white institute. I knew this whenever I applied to come to my school. However, it wasn't something that was a deal breaker for me. I was focused on finding a school that I loved, that had an in-state tuition price. As my journey at my undergrad ends, I think how attending a PWI may have had any influence on me in comparison if I would have gone to an HBCU. An HBCU is a historically black college or university. Many African-Americans chose to go to these institutes instead of a PWI, for a lot of different personal reasons. You have to understand from my perspective I am biracial, so I relate to the idea of a PWI or an HBCU differently, to me I share both aspects of the institutions that might be appealing to others.

Yes, when attending a PWI the diversity factor may not be as high; but the PWI that I attended gave opportunities to include yourself in diversity if you choose too. Yes, a majority of the professor at my school are of Caucasian decent, but over the past four years, I have seen the diversity increase by some measures.

My point of this post is still that college is what you make of it and the experiences that you decided to involve yourself in. You also chose who you hang around and decide to become friends within your college career. You decide what professors you feel like you have a connection with or favor. I do understand the importance of diversity, because you may relate to someone's experiences more than other dues to their racial background. We as humans want to be comfortable with the people around us. However, at the same time, we are all human and some of us do share the same idea of life and beliefs regardless of our skin color. It is about our experiences and our opinions, not the pigment of our skin that brings us together.

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