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The Secret To Winning A U.N. Security Council Seat? Candy.

It's not bribery if everyone is doing it.

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On Thursday, the United Nations elected five new members to the U.N. Security Council.

These members will serve a two-year term on the 15-member body, voting on matters of international peace and security.

This year's winners — Spain, New Zealand, Angola, Malaysia, and Venezuela — will replace Rwanda, Argentina, Australia, the Republic of Korea, and Luxembourg on the Council.

They'll join Chad, Chile, Jordan, Nigeria, and Lithuania along side the permanent members — the United States, the United Kingdom, France, China, and the Russian Federation.

Prior to the voting, though, U.N. ambassadors all found small tokens of appreciation from the candidates for the Security Council.

Campaign treats to the #UN member states @ Security Council election

NorwayUN@NorwayUNFollow

Campaign treats to the #UN member states @ Security Council election

10:50 AM - 16 Oct 14ReplyRetweetFavorite

Three of the seats were pre-decided based on the regional groups that had seats open.

Angola was the selected candidate for the Africa group, Malaysia for the Asian group, and Venezuela for Latin America and the Caribbean.

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Sugar was a major component in many of the countries' strategy.

Sugar overload? Turkish Delight, New Zealand Licorice and Venezuela artisan chocolates ... Not bad at all..

UgandaMissionNY@UgandaMissionNYFollow

Sugar overload? Turkish Delight, New Zealand Licorice and Venezuela artisan chocolates ... Not bad at all..

11:03 AM - 16 Oct 14ReplyRetweetFavorite

While most regional groups come to consensus months, if not years, before the vote in the General Assembly, it's not always the case. At times, the vote is the end of a lengthy slog to win over the support of 128 of the U.N.'s 193 member-states.

Among the three countries vying for two spots from the Western Europe and Others Group (WEOG), the competition was more fierce.

Comparative swag: on eve of #UNSC vote, photo of @NZUN book & bag, #Turkish thermos. #TapasThat

Inner City Press@innercitypressFollow

Comparative swag: on eve of #UNSC vote, photo of @NZUN book & bag, #Turkish thermos. #TapasThat

8:05 PM - 15 Oct 14ReplyRetweetFavorite

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In the end, it took three rounds for Spain to beat Turkey to take the last seat.

Spain's bag of candy and leather business card holders managed to capture a total of 132 votes in the last ballot against just 60 that went towards Turkey.

But the practice of giving gifts is nothing new in Security Council elections, as this photo from the 2011 election demonstrates.

Emma Kwesiga Lydersen / Via Norway UN Mission

The swag offered up in 2011, from countries like Pakistan, Morocco, and Hungary

Though always popular, sweets may not be the key to winning a tough race.

In 2012, the Australian delegation gave out "chocolate-coated hazelnut pralines shaped as kangaroos and koalas", a tin of mints, and a book Australia's achievements on the global stage. Their swag, along with Luxembourg's wooden ships, were enough to beat out Finland's dried blueberries.

But not always, as during the their failed bid in 2010, Canada reportedly gave out jugs of maple syrup to win votes. They lost handily to Portugal. And Turkey's Turkish Delight wasn't enough to seal their place on the Council.

Back in the 1990s, the competition for seats was even tougher.

"Competing for a seat against the Netherlands and Canada, two rather more restrained nations, Greece invited United Nations delegates to fly there to look over some Olympic sites, hear about a plan for declaring an international truce to mark the 2004 Olympic games, which will take place in Greece, then relax on an Aegean cruise," the New York Times reported in 1998.

And on very rare occasions, even in the case of a win, the gift can be a waste.

Photo: Here's a gift box #Saudi gave yesterday in GA." Should have said, "Thanks but no thanks?"

Inner City Press@innercitypressFollow

Photo: Here's a gift box #Saudi gave yesterday in GA." Should have said, "Thanks but no thanks?"

8:00 AM - 18 Oct 13ReplyRetweetFavorite

Last year, immediately after winning a seat on the Council, Saudi Arabia surprised everyone by turning down the spot. Instead, Jordan is the Arab country represented for the next year.

Hayes Brown is a world news editor and reporter for BuzzFeed News and is based in New York.

Contact Hayes Brown at hayes.brown@buzzfeed.com.

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