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Ten Everyday Words You Didn't Know Were German

You use German words every day! Not always correctly, but bonus points for trying!

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1.

In German, "angst" means fear. If you have angst, you are afraid. In the US if you are feeling "angsty" you are a '90s teenager.

In German, "angst" means fear. If you have angst, you are afraid. In the US if you are feeling "angsty" you are a '90s teenager.

2.

Hopefully we don't need to explain what an "automat" is, but just in case you were wondering: it means the same thing in German.

Hopefully we don't need to explain what an "automat" is, but just in case you were wondering: it means the same thing in German.

3.

"Wunderkind" sounds and looks German, but people are sometimes surprised that it is. Unlike some other German words that are used in English, "Wunderkind" is usually used properly.

"Wunderkind" sounds and looks German, but people are sometimes surprised that it is. Unlike some other German words that are used in English, "Wunderkind" is usually used properly.

4.

There was an entire generation of teenage boys who walked around using the word "über" without any idea what it meant. In English, it means the best. In German, it's just another annoying preposition.

There was an entire generation of teenage boys who walked around using the word "über" without any idea what it meant. In English, it means the best. In German, it's just another annoying preposition.

5.

All you need to know: a "strudel" in German is even more delicious than a "strudel" in English.

All you need to know: a "strudel" in German is even more delicious than a "strudel" in English.

6.

"Doppelgänger" is another one of those German words that are used correctly in English. Despite the umlaut (thats the two dots above the "a"), some people don't realize that this is a German word.

"Doppelgänger" is another one of those German words that are used correctly in English. Despite the umlaut (thats the two dots above the "a"), some people don't realize that this is a German word.

7.

"Wanderlust" is often used in newspapers or in novels to make literary feel poetic about wanting to travel. What it really means is: GET ME OUT OF HERE!

"Wanderlust" is often used in newspapers or in novels to make literary feel poetic about wanting to travel. What it really means is: GET ME OUT OF HERE!

8.

It should come as no surprise that many science words are borrowed from the German. Krebs Cycle, anyone?

It should come as no surprise that many science words are borrowed from the German. Krebs Cycle, anyone?

9.

This is one of those words that is used in English, but almost never in German. It literally means "driving enjoyment".

This is one of those words that is used in English, but almost never in German. It literally means "driving enjoyment".

10.

One of the Urban Dictionary definitions of Zeitgeist is: "Fancy German term frequently missused by people to make themeselves sound smarter than they are." Ahem. It's more along the lines of the spirit of the times. Much like this dictionary entry, in fact.

One of the Urban Dictionary definitions of Zeitgeist is: "Fancy German term frequently missused by people to make themeselves sound smarter than they are." Ahem. It's more along the lines of the spirit of the times. Much like this dictionary entry, in fact.

Written By Lauren Rogers

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