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16 German Words That Perfectly Describe How You Feel Right Now

Our gift to you on International Mother Language Day is a list of our favorite German words that are simply untranslatable. Enjoy!

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The closest approximation to Kummerspeck in English is probably "Freshman Fifteen," but in German, there are no timestamps on when Kummerspeck can happen. Whether you are worried, angry, or sad, if you turn to a block of cheese for comfort, you might be guilty of feeding your Kummerspeck.

Still, as a general rule, any word with bacon in it is a guaranteed win! (That may just be our Kummerspeck talking)

This word is for that horrible moment when your colleague is getting yelled at by the boss, or when you see a biker fall on a flat, empty street. When you cringe at someone else's gaffe, you are feeling the telltale signs of Fremdschämen. The best translation we could find is vicarious embarrassment, but it doesnt quite cover that awful feeling when you see someone else do something ridiculous. BONUS: FremdschämenTV is also a well-known term used to describe TV you watch and feel embarrassed for the people on the show. Think reality TV. We won't mention any specifics. You know what shows we mean.

Oh, Lebensmüde. Even saying the word makes us weary. Romantic German writers used to use this word more poetically, but nowadays it is usually used when someone does something epically stupid that could get them killed. "Bist du Lebensmüde?!" roughly translates to "Are you trying to kill yourself?!"

There is a dragon in every relationship, according to this German word. Drachenfutter is a gift given to your significant other after you severely messed up. It is used to "tame the beast," so to speak. Note: Do not call your gift Drachenfutter within earshot of the Dragon.

Fernweh is the opposite of Heimweh (homesickness). If you find yourself wanting to be anywhere other than where you are now, you are experiencing Fernweh. The only cure? Vacation. Try to sell that one to your employer.

Look at the state of the world. Now think about what your vision of an ideal world. Notice the differences? Sad, right? Congratulations, you are now feeling Weltschmerz. (No cure for this one, buddy.)

Your innerer Schweinehund is that tiny voice in the back of your head that tells you to get up and go running instead of staying a couch potato while eating a block of cheese and a bag of doritos. Overcome your inner pig dog and get going!!

You know that feeling right after you've graduated college and you have a job and you are in a relationship and the walls seem to be closing in because this is how everthing is going to be for the rest of your life andyoucan'tchangeit?? Breathe. You are just having a bit of Torschlusspanik. It will pass once you retire.

A Treppenwitz is a lethargic comeback. For example, let's say you are in a big fight with a coworker and they get the last word in. As you are walking away, you suddenly think of the best comeback ever, but the window has closed. But hey - at least you get to relive the fight over and over again in your head for the rest of the day!

In English, a Speckgürtel is a muffin top. However, in Germany, we think "muffin top" is much too cute a phrase - we like bacon belt better. Speckgürtel is also used to refer to the richest parts of a city i.e. "I love living in the Speckgürtel of Washington, DC!"

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