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Brits Try To Guess The Meaning Of Southern Slang

"So that's what the kids are calling wanking now."

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We asked BuzzFeed's UK office what they thought these 10 Southern words and phrases meant. Here's what they had to say:

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Emma: Reese Witherspoon's alter-ego. Beyonce has Sasha Fierce, Reese has Cooter Brown.

Nick: Is this a body part? "I showed her my Cooter Brown."

Luke: A sex move where you put fingers in the vag and the butthole. The cooter and the brown.

Simon: It's to do with bums. Tickly bums.

Janine: Something to do with picking your nose?

Melissa: Is there a person called Cooter Brown? Maybe it's used like "Cooter Brown, did you see that alligator over yonder?"

Actual meaning — A measure of drunkenness, i.e., "That boy's drunker than Cooter Brown!"

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Paul: Definitely a sex move.

Emma: In the South they all have secret tails, and when they get together at their secret Southern parties, they get them out. Then they all get a bit tipsy and go around secretly tying knots in each others tails, and finding it far funnier than it actually is.

Laura: So that's what the kids are calling wanking now.

Natalie: When you pull on a knot in your ponytail, usually a rather uncomfortable feeling.

Janine: Is it the same as taking the piss?

Melissa: Basically saying hold your wee in. As in "I'm desperate for a wee, well you need to jerk a knot in your tail lady!"??

Actual meaning — A threat of dire consequences, i.e., "I’m going to jerk a knot in your tail if you don't sit up straight!"

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Janine: Something to do with explosive diarrhea.

Emma: This sounds like something really unpleasant. What have you been doing to your geese?! In England it's the geese that terrorize us, not the other way around.

Paul: Someone making a lot of loud noise? Possibly a sex move.

Melissa: Poor goose is all I can say.

Becky: A very noisy, inappropriate thing happening in a repressed environment.

Simon: My standard Friday night.

Actual meaning — Very fast, i.e., "You run that mouth like a bell clapper in a goose's ass."

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Natalie: I WILL NOT ANSWER THIS ON THE GROUNDS OF FEMINISM.

Melissa: A party on a farm? Milly Cyrus's all time classic "Hoedown Throwdown" has inspired me here.

Paul: IT GOES BOOM CLAP, BOOM DE CLAP DE CLAP, BOOM BOOM CLAP.

Simon: People in the country dancing then doing sex.

Luke: A dance in a barn. Anger over the lack of taste this displayed was the primary cause of the civil war.

Luke: That's a folk dance, and definitely nothing to do with prostitutes.

Actual meaning — A type of American folk dance, i.e, "Grab your fiddle and let's start this hoedown!"

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Elizabeth: Why would you get on a stick? Is this dirty?

Emma: When someone really pisses you off (by being a right git), so you poke them with a stick.

Laura: Driving a tractor?

Simon: Get smashed? On weak lager and moonshine.

Ruth: Start driving? You guys say stick sometimes when you mean a car I think.

Nick: A "git" is a bit of an idiot. So I guess "git on the stick" could be referring to an idiot driving a car.

Actual meaning — To get busy working, i.e., "I can finish this BuzzFeed post by noon if I git on the stick."

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Luke: Literally nothing. It's only used to confuse tourists.

Melissa: I feel sorry for poultry in America, first a goose and now a hen!???

Becky: A miserable person, perhaps your mother-in-law?

Paul: I've kept chickens in the past and not once were they wet and in a tote sack. The fuck are you up to?

Natalie: When you've got to stuff your sweaty gym clothes into your bag and you just KNOW it's going to stink later.

Laura: Why do you guys want to do so many bad things to birds?

Actual meaning — An expression of anger, i.e., "That woman was madder than a wet hen in a tote sack!"

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Natalie: Dory from Finding Nemo's hot older brother.

Simon: Something about a fish. A sexy fish.

Chris: Tickety-boo

Paul: Totes amazeballs.

Emma: It means everything's A-OK. The British version would be "scrumdiddlyuptious" or "simply marvellous" or "alright".

Actual meaning — Free of trouble or concerns, i.e., "Everything is totally hunky-dory right now!"

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Emma: To be raring to go. Like a racehorse about to take off. In the South, their main transportation is horses, and this is where the saying comes from.

Ben: Hungry as fuck?

Natalie: Chewing on an ice lolly stick or lollipop.

Janine: Extremely excited to have sex with a horse.

Paul: Really keen, can't wait to do something. We use this one sometimes. We stole it. Thanks!

Actual meaning — To express impatience, i.e., "I haven't had my coffee yet and I'm chompin' at the bit to grab one."

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Luke: Pretty hot. Because in the South, frogs are believed to be the epitome of beauty.

Paul: Your shampoo commercials are getting unnecessarily insulting.

Natalie: Trick question, frogs don't have hair. So another way of describing baldness.

Ben: Someone with a beautiful face?

Janine: Something to do with Donald Trump.

Laura: America is weird.

Actual meaning — Extremely fine or excellent, i.e., "Damn! This burger is finer than a frog hair!"

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Paul: Vagina.

Luke: An animal that combines a cat and a hippopotamus. It's a crime against god.

Nick: Is this an affectionate name for someone? "She's my catawampus."

Janine: I bet it's fried and delicious with biscuit. I love biscuit.

Natalie: A cat on steroids.

Elizabeth: Totally clueless, but I will be using this for the rest of the day. Catawampus! Cowabunga! Shock and awe! Yee haw! We got 'im!

Actual meaning — Skewed or awry, i.e., "My work schedule today is completely catawampus!"