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10 Incredible Photo Stories You Absolutely Can’t Miss

Here are some of the most interesting and powerful photo stories from across the web.

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It’s amazing the parade of talent that showed up to our SXSW photo booth. It's also amazing the level of patience and creativity that photographer William Callan brought to the booth — 67 portraits in a single space is not for the faint of heart, but the results are super fun.

—Kate Bubacz, senior photo editor, BuzzFeed News

2. "33 Outrageous Pictures of Shopping Malls During the ’90s" — BuzzFeed News

James Devaney / Getty Images

Long before we ordered our groceries online and had a drone deliver the items to our home, there were malls: a one-stop shopping center for all the clothing, music, and toys one could afford complete with highly sought after seating at the food court. This fun photo essay highlights the many eccentricities of pre-internet-shopping mall life of the 1990s. Points if you rocked any of the ’90s fashion trends in this post; bonus points if you ever entered a drawing for the "mall car."

—Laura Geiser, photo editor, BuzzFeed News

3. "Unseen Apollo" — Time

Time does a great job presenting some of the NASA Apollo outtakes in this post, looking at why the images were excluded in favor of the more famous counterparts. In some ways I like the these better, the fuckups and one-offs and not-quites — the imperfections make the intangibility of space seem more real when viewed through the lens of human fallibility.

—K.B.

4. "Photographs From the World’s Largest Human Decomposition Center" — Hyperallergic

Robert Shults

Some viewers may find this quite disturbing. Robert Shults’ photo series “The Washing Away of Wrongs” takes a sensitive and thoughtful approach to the essential training that future forensic scientists undergo while in college. The topic at hand is morbid to say the least, but Shults’ pictures succeed in conveying the skill and training that goes into forensic research. This one is must-see, but maybe not immediately after having lunch.

—Gabriel H. Sanchez, photo essay editor, BuzzFeed News

5. "This Photographer Captured People’s Lives Through Their Hands" — PetaPixel

Omar Reda / Via Instagram: @omarreda

Much has been said about what the palm of a hand can reveal of one’s future, but Omar Reda’s project “Hands: The Story of Life” offers a different kind of discovery. His portraits deal with people’s past and present stories, about who they are, what they do, and what they’ve been through. After all, the palm contains one’s identity — not just so it can be scanned for entry in high-tech labs, but because everything we do with our hands adds to our own unique history.

—Anna Mendoza, photo editor, BuzzFeed Australia

For many Americans, the aftermath of 9/11 left us with more questions than answers. Today, the events that transpired that morning still evoke feelings of horror and confusion as we continue to make sense of such a horrendous act of violence. These pictures, re-released by the FBI this past week, provide a firsthand account of the destruction at the Pentagon that left 184 dead. The images appear clerical and eerily silent, offering an unadulterated perspective of 9/11 first responders.

—G.H.S.

7. "150 Years Ago Today, the US Bought Alaska From Russia for $7.2 Million" — Atlantic

Michael Maslan / Getty Images

A former Alaskan tour guide, Atlantic editor Alan Taylor put together quite the collection of images to celebrate the purchase of the 49th US state from Russia in 1867. The post is an eclectic mix of rarely seen archival photos; exhibitions of Alaska’s raw, wild beauty; and reminders of some of the state’s darker days. If your knowledge of Alaska stops at Sarah Palin and caribou, prepare to be educated.

—L.G.

Alex Thompson’s work reveals the complexity of environmental issues in the American West. The essay looks closely at how land rights and mineral rights have been split in Wyoming, leaving residents at the mercy of the federal government and mining companies' decisions. This loss of autonomy highlights the frustrating struggle to balance jobs, land, and pollution.

—K.B.

9. "Return From the Jungle" — The Intercept

Newsha Tavakolian / Magnum Photos

Newsha Tavakolian’s photos of postwar female guerrillas in Colombia evoke a sense of quietness — she makes you feel that there’s hope outside the jungles but also sense the undeniable struggle during their transition. I’m particularly drawn to the portraits where these women still feel the need to clasp their guns and how this is symbolic of their journey toward relearning the concept of trust.

—A.M.

BuzzFeed's resident photo geek.

Contact Gabriel H. Sanchez at gabriel.sanchez@buzzfeed.com.

Kate Bubacz is a Senior Photo Editor for BuzzFeed News and is based in New York.

Contact Kate Bubacz at kate.bubacz@buzzfeed.com.

Laura is a photo editor for BuzzFeed News and is based in Los Angeles.

Contact Laura Geiser at laura.geiser@buzzfeed.com.

Anna Mendoza is a photo editor for BuzzFeed and is based in Sydney, Australia.

Contact Anna Mendoza at Anna.Mendoza@buzzfeed.com.

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