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24 Badass Historic Photos From The Early Days Of NASA

To infinity and beyond!

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The seven astronauts of NASA's Mercury program pose for a photo in 1960. From top left to bottom right: Walter M. Schirra, Deke Slayton, John Glenn Jr., M. Scott Carpenter, Alan B. Shepard Jr., Virgil I. Grissom, and Leroy Gordon Cooper Jr.

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Ham, a chimpanzee astronaut that flew aboard the Mercury-Redstone 2 spacecraft, is greeted by Commander Ralph A. Brackett on the USS Donner, after being recovered from his flight at sea on January 31st, 1961.

Hank Walker / Getty Images

U.S. Army engineer Roland Van Allen is seen soldering components to a plastic telemetering card to be installed in a satellite launched in 1957. The card combines 48 separate signals into a single coded radio message.

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Astronauts, Buzz Aldrin (left, in blue), Charles Bassett (top, in blue), and Theodore Freeman (bottom, in orange), along with several technicians, experience weightlessness in a reduced gravity aircraft as part of their NASA mission training in 1964.

Ralph Morse / Getty Images

A group of the wives of Project Mercury astronauts relax and talk together in Virginia, 1959. They are, clockwise from lower left, Rene Carpenter (with platinum blond hair), Annie Glenn, Jo Schirra, Betty Grissom (on couch at right), Marjorie Slayton (on floor at right), and Trudy Cooper (standing with serving tray).

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Science & Society Picture Librar / Getty Images

In this photo from 1964, researchers at NASA's Langley Research Center conduct studies to determine the types of difficulties astronauts might encounter on the lunar surface, where the force of gravity is only one-sixth that of Earth. A system of slings supports the weight of the man and allows him to jump and walk while encumbered in his spacesuit.

Bettmann / Bettmann Archive

Astronauts Walter Schirra, left, and Thomas Stafford, right, practice water escape from the two man Gemini capsule at the NASA facilities. Schirra assists Astronaut Stafford in leaving the capsule.

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The Mission Operations Control Room in Houston, Texas, is seen during the fourth television transmission from the Apollo 13 spacecraft while en route to the Moon. Shortly after the transmission ended, an explosion occurred that ended any hope of a lunar landing and jeopardized the lives of the three crew members.

AFP / Getty Images

The rocket carrying the Mercury "Friendship-7" capsule with astronaut John Glenn aboard blasts off in Cape Canaveral, Florida, on February 20nd, 1962, for the first US manned orbital flight ever.

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A heavy beard covers the face of astronaut Walter M. Schirra Jr., Apollo 7 Commander, as he looks out the rendezvous window in front of the Commander's station on the ninth day of the Apollo 7 Earth orbital mission.

Neil Armstrong / NASA

The reflections of Astronaut Neil Armstrong, the U.S. Flag, and the Lunar Module are reflected in the face mask of Astronaut Buzz Aldrin when his picture was taken by Armstrong as they walked across the surface of the moon on July 31st, 1969.

NASA

President Richard M. Nixon welcomes the Apollo 11 astronauts, (left to right) Neil A. Armstrong, commander; Michael Collins, command module pilot; and Buzz Aldrin, lunar module pilot, while they are still in quarantine aboard the U.S.S. Hornet.

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