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A Woman Designed Tableware For People With Alzheimer’s After Being Inspired By Her Late Grandmother

BuzzFeed News spoke to Sha Yao, the creator of EatWell.

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Taiwanese industrial designer Sha Yao was inspired to create a tableware set by her late grandmother who had Alzheimer’s.

"When she was diagnosed with the disease I felt frustrated (as do many caregivers) seeing her gradually lose her ability to take care of herself, but there was not much I could do to help," she told BuzzFeed News.
EatWell

"When she was diagnosed with the disease I felt frustrated (as do many caregivers) seeing her gradually lose her ability to take care of herself, but there was not much I could do to help," she told BuzzFeed News.

Eatwell is a tableware set designed specifically for people with eating difficulties. "I came up with an idea to work on improving her eating experience first, since eating is such an essential part of daily living," Yao said.

EatWell

The product aims to help make the process of eating easier and more comfortable for people with motor, physical, or cognitive impairments, such as scleroses, palsies, Alzheimer's, and other forms of dementia.

Yao's EatWell collection has over 20 features that specifically address some of the most common issues people with special needs face during meals, like confusing patterns on plates with food, or knocking over cups.

EatWell

It's designed to simplify eating motions, reduce accidents, and help users eat as much as possible.

For example, the bowls are equipped with slanted basins to make it easier to gather food, and one side of each bowl is right-angled to provide a more effective surface to scoop against.

EatWell
EatWell

The bowls are brightly coloured on the outside in order to stimulate appetite, whereas the inside is a contrasting blue to help users distinguish the bowl from food.

EatWell

The spoons precisely match the curvatures of the bowl, making the process of scooping food easier and more efficient.

EatWell

And the collection includes an anti-tipping mug, a cup with an extended handle to provide extra support, and straw-securing lids.

EatWell
EatWell

Yao describes the reaction to EatWell as extremely encouraging and motivating.

"The feedback from specialists and academics in the industry, as well as experienced caretakers and nurses, has generally been overwhelmingly positive," she said.

EatWell

Yao plans to add one final piece to her EatWell collection next year. She is currently taking pre-orders through her website and Indiegogo campaign page.