back to top
Community

How To Choose A Potted Rose

Whether you decide to keep it in a pot or transplant it into the garden - a potted rose is a beautiful accent to your landscape. Keep these five things in mind - and choosing a potted rose will be easy.

Posted on

Getting Started

Whether you decide to keep it in a pot or transplant it into the garden - a potted rose is a beautiful accent to your landscape. Keep these five things in mind - and choosing a potted rose will be easy.

1. Roses are hearty feeders

2. They need room to grow

3. Choose a rose with strong stems, not leggy. If it has blooms, the stem should be strong enough to hold them. Also, a thick stem allows enough nourishment to flow to the top ... where the blooms are.

4. Disturb the roots as little as possible when planting ... a secret to success with potted roses.

5. A potted rose can be fertilized right away.

Now, check the bottom of the pot. If roots are coming out the holes, the plant is root bound. The pot is too small. If you want to keep it in a pot, use one that is 2"-4" larger. Five-gallon pots are great for growing hybrid teas and miniatures.

WHAT ELSE TO LOOK FOR WHEN CHOOSING A POTTED ROSE

Poke a finger in the soil to tell if the soil is moist deeper in the pot. Garden centers water their plants in the morning and evening. However, if the plant has been dry for a long time, the water slips through, and is not absorbed. If the potted rose is dry and has many blooms, it could be a stressed plant. Maybe even a left-over from last year's batch.

I have found that it depends on the type of rose ... whether it will survive or not. A well-prepared spot in the garden could make such a potted rose flourish or it could be disease prone if it stays in a pot. Grandifloras, and floribundas definitely need their space ... to grow a broad root system ... and spread their branches above ground. My favorite, GRAHAM THOMAS, a yellow floribunda, spreads about seven feet in diameter.

THE STORY OF A POTTED HEIRLOOM ROSE

When I moved to St. Louis, MO, I wanted to grow an heirloom rose. Frisella Nursery, just outside St. Louis, had a Gertrude Jekyll ... one of my favorite heirloom roses. A month and a half later, I brought it home to plant. Why did I wait? ' because there was still a chance temperatures would drop below 28 degrees ' the freezing point for roses.

The nursery took care of the rose during that time. It was transferred to a larger pot, and kept well fertilized as it grew. They did not charge me extra for this service. Another great place to shop for a potted rose is on the Internet. Most growers will replace them if they don't grow. I've had great success with them. One rose that didn't grow for me, was replaced with no questions asked. I had purchased two other roses from them that flourished.

Now that you've selected a healthy potted rose (or two), you want to get home and plant it. When you're ready to plant your rose, please select Planting Roses for detailed instructions.

BEFORE YOU GO SHOPPING ...

You may want to check other links like judi online on this site for helpful information on chemical fertilizers or organic fertilizers Let us know how it went. We appreciate your comments and questions.

My Gertrude Jekyll heirloom potted rose is doing great. She's been a healthy bloomer all through this sweltering hot summer. I found her at Frisella Nursery just outside of St. Louis. The nursery has a special section of heirloom roses you can select from. They'll care for your rose til planting time. Many large nurseries and growers offer this service. It's a great way to get a special rose off to a good start.

How is your potted rose doing? Was the information on this page helpful? Give us your comments and questions.

This post was created by a member of BuzzFeed Community, where anyone can post awesome lists and creations. Learn more or post your buzz!