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    People Are Sharing The Signs That A Tourist Is American, And It's A Little Embarrassing

    "Extra ice in their drinks."

    There are several ways you can stick out like a sore thumb when you're in a foreign country.

    WB / Via giphy.com

    Reddit user u/mknapp37 asked, "Besides their accent, what's one way you know a tourist is American?" The thread was filled with the many ways in which American culture and tendencies are very different from those of other countries, such as tipping waiters and asking for ice in their drinks.

    Here are some of the biggest signs:

    1. "When Americans introduce themselves, they never say they're from America; mostly they say the state/city they're from."

    Election 2016 / Via giphy.com

    2. "Saying 'Hi, how are you?' to the barista, servers, retail workers. My country doesn’t quite have that culture, so I find it really sweet."

    u/tomayto_tomaahto

    3. "Went to Russia once, and they knew I was American because I smiled too much."

    4. "The absolute fearlessness of asking anyone on the street about anything."

    u/AthleticallyLazy

    5. "Whenever I hear someone say 'ma'am,' I know they're American.

    RuPaul's Drag Race / Via giphy.com

    "Like, one time I was in a Lidls store, and there was an American family asking someone who worked there if they sold 'cellphones,' and when the woman said they didn't, they were all, 'Oh, okay, thank you for your time, ma'am! Have a great day!' which is much more cheery than the average Scot."

    u/foundcosy

    6. "They’re looking for a store open at like 11 p.m. Even in most European countries, stores close at like 7–8 p.m."

    u/millennium-popsicle

    7. "Americans will be wearing sneakers."

    MTV / Via giphy.com

    8. "Trying to interact with strangers in public areas."

    u/Cona3704

    9. "Asking for the restroom."

    Comedy Central / Via giphy.com

    10. "If you see an American in Japan, they will frantically look for public trash cans.

    "The absence of trash receptacles is something unfounded in the US, and we become confused at the idea of having to hold it for extended periods of time."

    u/Dayoldpancakes

    11. "Baseball caps, university-spirit wear, cargo shorts, free T-shirts from events with ads and text all over them."

    Lifetime / Via giphy.com

    12. "I was at a beach where music was playing, and 'Sweet Caroline' came on. I told my sister, 'Hey, if you are wondering who here is from the US, you are about to find out.'"

    u/ardyndidnothingwrong

    13. "Handing the credit card to the server to be taken away and processed."

    Capital One / Via giphy.com

    14. "When they cross the street, they expect cars to stop for them. In my country, the cars will run you down without thinking twice."

    u/ToeRagger

    15. "Confidence. I have never seen someone walk so confidently in the wrong direction like an American can."

    Little Movie / Via giphy.com

    16. "I remember asking for the bathroom in New Zealand, and the lady looked at me and said, 'You can't have a bath in my restaurant.'"

    u/mrubuto22

    17. "Extra ice in their drinks."

    Tarn in a Barn / Via giphy.com

    18. "I met a man in Turkey who was stunned when we told him we were American. He more or less said/gestured that he thought we would be fat. I doubt he had come into contact with many of us, and apparently our perception abroad is...heavy set."

    u/slumdog88

    19. "When they comment about the driving."

    Hulu / Via giphy.com

    20. "If they buy peanut butter. It sounds very weird, but everyone who buys peanut butter where I work turns out to be American."

    u/Per_The_Pear

    21. "I got drunk in Antwerp, and I think the bartender got a little confused because I was talking to him like we were old friends, and I left a tip when I left.

    NBC / Via giphy.com

    "When he tried to refuse, I told him that as an American (which was very obvious), it was against the law for me not to tip. Drunk me is quite social and generous."

    u/FaptainAwesome

    22. "People assume you're either American or 'slow' if you smile in public in former Eastern Bloc countries."

    u/ProcrastimusPrime

    23. "They get amazed by old things."

    NBC / Via giphy.com

    24. "Speak English louder at people who don't speak English until they understand."

    u/justdan7

    25. "I would say impeccable facial hair. Maybe they get a trim before they go on holiday, but I'm always impressed by their tidy beards and mustaches."

    ABC / Via giphy.com

    Which other things do Americans do that makes them stick out in other countries? Let us know in the comments below!

    Note: Some responses have been edited for length and/or clarity.

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