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16 Amazing Then And Now Pictures Of New York City

From the late 1800s to now, photographer Andrew Farris shows how New York has evolved.

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1. Madison Square Park 1880 vs. Madison Square Park Now

Between 1876 and 1882, the Statue of Liberty arm was in Madison Square Park for fundraising to complete the Statue. Anyone could pay 50 cents to climb to the torch balcony.

Between 1876 and 1882, the Statue of Liberty arm was in Madison Square Park for fundraising to complete the Statue. Anyone could pay 50 cents to climb to the torch balcony.

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Between 1876 and 1882, the Statue of Liberty arm was in Madison Square Park for fundraising to complete the Statue. Anyone could pay 50 cents to climb to the torch balcony.

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3. Brooklyn Bridge 1888 vs. Now

Now-covered train tracks, rooftops, and arches of the Brooklyn Bridge can be seen from the rear of a train during the Blizzard of 1888.

Now-covered train tracks, rooftops, and arches of the Brooklyn Bridge can be seen from the rear of a train during the Blizzard of 1888.

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Now-covered train tracks, rooftops, and arches of the Brooklyn Bridge can be seen from the rear of a train during the Blizzard of 1888.

5. Broadway and 39th Street 1900 vs. Now

The Casino Theatre, Broadway and 39th Street, Manhattan. The Knickerbocker Theatre is to its right. Signage on the Casino announces The Belle of Bohemia, which played there Sept. 24 to Nov. 10, 1900.

The Casino Theatre, Broadway and 39th Street, Manhattan. The Knickerbocker Theatre is to its right. Signage on the Casino announces The Belle of Bohemia, which played there Sept. 24 to Nov. 10, 1900.

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The Casino Theatre, Broadway and 39th Street, Manhattan. The Knickerbocker Theatre is to its right. Signage on the Casino announces The Belle of Bohemia, which played there Sept. 24 to Nov. 10, 1900.

6. Federal Hall 1918 vs. Now

Charlie Chaplin stands on Douglas Fairbanks' shoulders during a Liberty Bonds rally. They are at the foot of George Washington’s statue in front of the Sub-Treasury (now Federal Hall National Memorial).

Charlie Chaplin stands on Douglas Fairbanks' shoulders during a Liberty Bonds rally. They are at the foot of George Washington’s statue in front of the Sub-Treasury (now Federal Hall National Memorial).

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Charlie Chaplin stands on Douglas Fairbanks' shoulders during a Liberty Bonds rally. They are at the foot of George Washington’s statue in front of the Sub-Treasury (now Federal Hall National Memorial).

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10. Broadway and 45th Street 1908 vs. Now

Hotel Astor (largest building); to its right, Astor Theatre on the northwest corner of Broadway and 45th Street; to its right, the Gaiety Building.

Hotel Astor (largest building); to its right, Astor Theatre on the northwest corner of Broadway and 45th Street; to its right, the Gaiety Building.

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Hotel Astor (largest building); to its right, Astor Theatre on the northwest corner of Broadway and 45th Street; to its right, the Gaiety Building.

11. New York Stock Exchange 1920 vs. Now

Joseph Petrocelli (American, died 1928). "The Curb Market — New York, 1920." Bromoil print. Brooklyn Museum.

12. Times Square 1908 vs. Now

Looking south down Broadway in Times Square. At left, the site of the future Loew's State Theatre and Loew's Corporation headquarters building. Center, the former Hammerstein's Olympia entertainment complex; the glass-enclosed Jardin de Paris rooftop theatre is visible. A sign announces the Ziegfeld Follies of 1908, which played there June 15 to Sept. 6, 1908.

Looking south down Broadway in Times Square. At left, the site of the future Loew's State Theatre and Loew's Corporation headquarters building. Center, the former Hammerstein's Olympia entertainment complex; the glass-enclosed Jardin de Paris rooftop theatre is visible. A sign announces the Ziegfeld Follies of 1908, which played there June 15 to Sept. 6, 1908.

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Looking south down Broadway in Times Square. At left, the site of the future Loew's State Theatre and Loew's Corporation headquarters building. Center, the former Hammerstein's Olympia entertainment complex; the glass-enclosed Jardin de Paris rooftop theatre is visible. A sign announces the Ziegfeld Follies of 1908, which played there June 15 to Sept. 6, 1908.

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13. Times Square 1900 vs. Now

On the left, the former Hammerstein's Olympia entertainment complex, part of which became the New York Theatre. In the distance is the back of the Pabst Hotel, partly blocked by four-story buildings which share its block. The Hotel Cadillac on the northeast corner of 43rd Street is in the middle distance.

On the left, the former Hammerstein's Olympia entertainment complex, part of which became the New York Theatre. In the distance is the back of the Pabst Hotel, partly blocked by four-story buildings which share its block. The Hotel Cadillac on the northeast corner of 43rd Street is in the middle distance.

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On the left, the former Hammerstein's Olympia entertainment complex, part of which became the New York Theatre. In the distance is the back of the Pabst Hotel, partly blocked by four-story buildings which share its block. The Hotel Cadillac on the northeast corner of 43rd Street is in the middle distance.

14. Times Square 1898 vs. Now

Looking northwest down 42nd Street (left) from Broadway. Right half of the picture is the triangular island between Broadway and Seventh Avenue, where One Times Square now stands, which replaced the Pabst Building, a nine-story hotel and restaurant begun in October 1898 and completed a year later. At left, across Seventh Avenue, is the future site of Hammerstein's Victoria and Roof Garden.

Looking northwest down 42nd Street (left) from Broadway. Right half of the picture is the triangular island between Broadway and Seventh Avenue, where One Times Square now stands, which replaced the Pabst Building, a nine-story hotel and restaurant begun in October 1898 and completed a year later. At left, across Seventh Avenue, is the future site of Hammerstein's Victoria and Roof Garden.

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Looking northwest down 42nd Street (left) from Broadway. Right half of the picture is the triangular island between Broadway and Seventh Avenue, where One Times Square now stands, which replaced the Pabst Building, a nine-story hotel and restaurant begun in October 1898 and completed a year later. At left, across Seventh Avenue, is the future site of Hammerstein's Victoria and Roof Garden.

Andrew has more Then and Now photos from cities around the world on his Instagram and Facebook page. (All captions via WikiCommons.)

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