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How Much Do You Know About British Art?

Can you tell a Leighton from a Lowry? A Hockney from a Hilliard? Is the work of Millais a mere melee? Or does Sickert's portraits make you sick as a parrot?

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  1. 1. Who painted 'Going to the Match' ?

    Via bbc.co.uk
    L. S. Lowry
    William Hogarth
    Stanley Spencer
    Christopher R. W. Nevinson
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Laurence Stephen Lowry (1887 – 1976)

    was born in Stretford, Lancashire. Much of his work depicts Pendlebury, where he lived and worked for more than 40 years, and also Salford and its surrounding areas.

    Laurence Stephen Lowry (1887 – 1976)
    National Portrait Gallery / Via npg.org.uk
  2. 2. Who painted 'The Fighting Temeraire' ?

    The National Gallery / Via commons.wikimedia.org
    John Constable
    Claude Monet
    John Ruskin
    J. M. W. Turner
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Joseph Mallord William Turner (1775 – 1851)

    A Romanticist landscape painter, watercolourist, and printmaker, Turner was considered a controversial figure in his day, but is now regarded as the artist who elevated landscape painting to an eminence rivalling history painting.

    Joseph Mallord William Turner (1775 – 1851)
    Tate, London / Via en.wikipedia.org
  3. 3. Who painted 'Venus Verticordia' ?

    Via commons.wikimedia.org
    Frederick Sandys
    Dante Gabriel Rossetti
    John Everett Millais
    Thomas Gainsborough
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Dante Gabriel Rossetti (1828 – 1882)

    A poet, illustrator, painter and translator, Rossetti co-founded the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood in 1848 and was later to be the main inspiration for a second generation of artists and writers influenced by the movement. His work also influenced the European Symbolists and was a major precursor of the Aesthetic movement.

    Dante Gabriel Rossetti (1828 – 1882)
    William Holman Hunt - Portrait of Dante Gabriel Rossetti. Licensed under Public Domain / Via en.wikipedia.org
  4. 4. Who painted 'The Ladies Waldegrave' ?

    The National Gallery, London / Via nationalgalleries.org
    Sir Joshua Reynolds
    Thomas Gainsborough
    Joseph Wright of Derby
    Frederic Leighton
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Sir Joshua Reynolds (1723 - 1792)

    Sir Joshua Reynolds PRA FRS FRSA (1723 – 1792) was an influential eighteenth-century painter, specialising in portraits. He promoted the "Grand Style" in painting which depended on idealization of the imperfect. He was a founder and first president of the Royal Academy of Arts, and was knighted by George III in 1769.

    Sir Joshua Reynolds (1723 - 1792)
    Licensed under Public Domain / Via en.wikipedia.org
  5. 5. Who painted 'Peter Getting Out of Nick's Pool' ?

    Walker Art Gallery, National Museums Liverpool / Via liverpoolmuseums.org.uk
    Percy Wyndham Lewis
    Damien Hirst
    David Hockney
    Laura Knight
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    David Hockney (1937 - )

    Born in Bradford, England, in 1937, David Hockney attended art school in London before moving to Los Angeles in the 1960s. There, he painted his famous swimming pool paintings. In the 1970s, Hockney began working in photography, creating photo collages he called joiners. He continues to create and exhibit art, and in 2011 he was voted the most influential British artist of the 20th century.

    David Hockney (1937 - )
    Via biography.com
  6. 6. Who painted 'Whistlejacket' ?

    The National Gallery, London / Via nationalgallery.org.uk
    George Stubbs
    Thomas Gainsborough
    Laura Knight
    John Constable
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    George Stubbs (1724 – 1806)

    George Stubbs was classified in his lifetime as a sporting painter, and as such was excluded from full membership of the Royal Academy. He is best remembered for his paintings of horses. Early clients for his sporting and racing paintings included many of the noblemen who founded the Jockey Club. Like Gainsborough, he later painted scenes of peasant life, as well as studies of wild and exotic animals.

    George Stubbs (1724 – 1806)
    Licensed under Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons / Via en.wikipedia.org
  7. 7. Who painted 'The Lady of Shalott' ?

    Via en.wikipedia.org
    John Constable
    Edward Burne-Jones
    John Everett Millais
    John William Waterhouse
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    John William Waterhouse (1849 - 1917)

    Known for working in the Pre-Raphaelite style although he actually worked several decades after the breakup of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood, leading to his sobriquet "the modern Pre-Raphaelite". Borrowing stylistic influences not only from the earlier Pre-Raphaelites but also from the Impressionists, his artworks were known for their depictions of women from both ancient Greek mythology and Arthurian legend.

    John William Waterhouse (1849 - 1917)
    http://H.S. Mendelssohn 1848–1908. Licensed under Public Domain / Via en.wikipedia.org
  8. 8. Who painted 'The Blue Boy' ?

    The Yorck Project. Licensed under Public Domain / Via en.wikipedia.org
    John Constable
    Thomas Gainsborough
    Peter Lily
    Luke Fildes
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Thomas Gainsborough (1727 - 1788)

    Gainsborough was, with Reynolds (his main rival), the leading portrait painter in England in the later 18th century. The feathery brushwork of his mature work and rich sense of colour contribute to the enduring popularity of his portraits. Unlike Reynolds, he avoids references to Italian Renaissance art or the antique, and shows his sitters in fashionable contemporary dress.

    Thomas Gainsborough (1727 - 1788)
    National Portrait Gallery, London / Via en.wikipedia.org
  9. 9. Who painted 'The Railway Station' ?

    Royal Holloway, University of London / Via bbc.co.uk
    Ford Madox Brown
    William Frith
    Joseph Wright of Derby
    L. S. Lowry
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    William Powell Frith (1819 – 1909)

    Frith specialised in genre subjects and panoramic narrative works of life in the Victorian era. He was elected to the Royal Academy in 1853 and has been described as the "greatest British painter of the social scene since Hogarth. The Railway Station, arguably his masterpiece, demonstrates both his eye for the anecdotal and his inclination to appeal to sentiment.

    William Powell Frith (1819 – 1909)
    National Portrait Gallery, London / Via en.wikipedia.org
  10. 10. Who painted 'The Beguiling of Merlin' ?

    Edward Burne-Jones [Public domain] / Via commons.wikimedia.org
    Ford Madox Brown
    Joseph Wright of Derby
    Laura Knight
    Edward Burne-Jones
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Edward Burne-Jones (1833 – 1898)

    An artist and designer closely associated with the later phase of the Pre-Raphaelite movement, who worked closely with William Morris on a wide range of decorative arts and was a founding partner of Morris & Co. Burne-Jones was closely involved in the rejuvenation of the tradition of stained glass art in Britain and worked in a variety of crafts; including designing ceramic tiles, jewellery, tapestries, mosaics and book illustration, most famously designing woodcuts for the Kelmscott Press's Chaucer in 1896.

    Edward Burne-Jones (1833 – 1898)
    Frederick Hollyer. Licensed under Public Domain / Via en.wikipedia.org
  11. 11. Who painted 'The Hay Wain' ?

    The National Gallery, London / Via nationalgallery.org.uk
    John Constable
    William Blake
    John Everett Millais
    J. M. W. Turner
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    John Constable (1776 – 1837)

    A Romantic painter born in Suffolk, known principally for his landscape paintings of Dedham Vale, the area surrounding his home now known as "Constable Country." Constable invested this region with an intensity of affection, "I should paint my own places best", he wrote to his friend John Fisher in 1821, "painting is but another word for feeling".

    John Constable (1776 – 1837)
    Stephencdickson. Licensed under CC / Via en.wikipedia.org
  12. 12. Who painted 'Work' ?

    Via en.wikipedia.org
    Joseph Wright of Derby
    Ford Madox Brown
    Walter Sickert
    John Everett Millais
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Ford Madox Brown (1821 – 1893)

    Known as a painter of moral and historical subjects and his notable graphic and Hogarthian portrayal of life. Brown had a close affiliation with both the Pre-Raphaelite movement and the City of Manchester despite never truly belonging to either. He spent his latter years painting the hugely impressive (and free to view) Manchester Murals in Manchester Town Hall.

    Ford Madox Brown (1821 – 1893)
    Licensed under Public Domain / Via en.wikipedia.org
  13. 13. Who painted 'Nebuchadnezzar' ?

    Tate Britain / Via en.wikipedia.org
    Joseph Wright of Derby
    Percy Wyndham Lewis
    William Blake
    Walter Sickert
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    William Blake (1757 – 1827)

    A poet, painter, and printmaker who remained largely unrecognised during his lifetime. Blake is now considered a seminal figure in the history of the poetry and visual arts of the Romantic Age. His art led one contemporary art critic to proclaim him "far and away the greatest artist Britain has ever produced". In 2002, Blake was placed at number 38 in the BBC's poll of the 100 Greatest Britons.

    William Blake (1757 – 1827)
    National Portrait Gallery, London / Via en.wikipedia.org
  14. 14. Who painted 'An Experiment on a Bird in an Air Pump" ?

    The National Gallery, London / Via nationalgallery.org.uk
    Walter Sickert
    Joseph Wright of Derby
    Frederic Leighton
    Harold Gilman
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Joseph Wright of Derby (1734 – 1797)

    A landscape and portrait painter who has been acclaimed as "the first professional painter to express the spirit of the Industrial Revolution". Wright is notable for his use of the Chiaroscuro effect, which emphasises the contrast of light and dark, and for his paintings of candle-lit subjects. Many of Wright's paintings and drawings are owned by Derby City Council, and are on display at the Derby Museum and Art Gallery.

    Joseph Wright of Derby (1734 – 1797)
    Licensed under Public Domain / Via en.wikipedia.org
  15. 15. Who painted 'Ophelia' ?

    Tate Britain / Via en.wikipedia.org
    John Everett Millais
    Harold Gilman
    Frederic Leighton
    George Frederic Watts
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Sir John Everett Millais (1829 – 1896)

    A painter and illustrator who was one of the founders of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood. Millais was a child prodigy who at the age of eleven became the youngest student to enter the Royal Academy Schools. His later works were enormously successful, making Millais one of the wealthiest artists of his day. Millais' personal life has also played a significant role in his reputation. His wife Effie was formerly married to the critic John Ruskin, who had supported Millais' early work. The annulment of the marriage and her marriage to Millais have sometimes been linked to his change of style.

    Sir John Everett Millais (1829 – 1896)
    John Guile Millais. Licensed under Public Domain / Via en.wikipedia.org
  16. 16. Who painted 'The Camden Town Murder' or 'What Shall We Do for the Rent' ?

    Licensed under Public Domain / Via en.wikipedia.org
    Walter Sickert
    Harold Gilman
    William Hogarth
    Percy Wyndham Lewis
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Walter Richard Sickert (1860 – 1942)

    Walter Sickert was one of the most influential British painters of his day. He thought that most paintings were too sentimental and that art needed to embrace the dark side of real life. He was a member of the group of artists known as the Camden Town Group and influenced their style and subject matter. Sickert started his career as an assistant to the influential American artist James Whistler. He followed in his footsteps by spending time in Paris. While he was there, Sickert saw a lot of Impressionist paintings, and for a long time was Britain's main source of contact with modern ideas about painting being developed in France.

    Walter Richard Sickert (1860 – 1942)
    George Charles Beresford 1911. Licensed under Public Domain / Via en.wikipedia.org
  17. 17. Who painted 'A Dark Pool' ?

    Laing Art Gallery / Via bbc.co.uk
    Frederic Leighton
    Bridget Riley
    Laura Knight
    Harold Gilman
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Dame Laura Knight (1877 – 1970)

    Knight was a painter in the figurative, realist tradition who embraced English Impressionism. During her long career, Knight was among the most successful and popular painters in Britain. In 1929 she was created a Dame and in 1936 became the first woman elected to the Royal Academy since its foundation in 1768. Her large retrospective exhibition at the Royal Academy, in 1965, was another first for a woman. Although Knight was known for painting amidst the world of the theatre and ballet in London, and for being a war artist during the Second World War, she was also greatly interested in, and inspired by, more marginalised communities and individuals including Gypsies and circus performers. Her success in the male-dominated British art establishment paved the way for greater status and recognition for women artists.

    Dame Laura Knight (1877 – 1970)
    National Portrait Gallery, London / Via en.wikipedia.org
  18. 18. Who painted 'Dame (Alice) Ellen Terry ('Choosing')' ?

    National Portrait Gallery, London / Via npg.org.uk
    Bridget Riley
    George Frederic Watts
    Harold Gilman
    Barbara Hepworth
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    George Frederic Watts (1817 – 1904)

    Born on the same day as George Frederic Handle, after whom he was named, Watts was a hugely popular painter in his lifetime. He was closely associated with the Symbolist movement and once said "I paint ideas, not things." The Watts Gallery and Chapel in Surrey is devoted to hie life and work.

    George Frederic Watts (1817 – 1904)
    Ogden's Guinea Gold Cigarettes trade card / Via en.wikipedia.org
  19. 19. Who painted 'Mrs Mounter at the Breakfast Table' ?

    Tate Gallery / Via tate.org.uk
    Lucien Freud
    Paul Nash
    William Hogarth
    Harold Gilman
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Harold John Wilde Gilman (1876 – 1919)

    Harold Gilman was one of the main instigators in the formation of the Camden Town Group. Despite dying at the age of forty-three in 1919, his strong-minded and ardent personality, as revealingly displayed in this portrait by Walter Sickert, meant that he made a lasting impact on the British art world at the beginning of the twentieth century. He had a taste for painting working class subjects including Mrs Mounter, his landlady.

    Harold John Wilde Gilman (1876 – 1919)
    Walter Sickert. Licensed under Public Domain / Via en.wikipedia.org
  20. 20. Who painted 'Benefits Supervisor Resting' ?

    Via bbc.com
    Tracey Emin
    Lucien Freud
    Paul Nash
    Bridget Riley
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Lucian Michael Freud (1922 – 2011)

    Despite being born in Germany, Freud is now considered the pre-eminent British artist of his time. His works are noted for their psychological penetration, and for their often discomforting examination of the relationship between artist and model.

    Lucian Michael Freud (1922 – 2011)
    "LucienFreud" by procsilas . Licensed under CC. / Via en.wikipedia.org
  21. 21. Who painted 'Study after Velázquez's Portrait of Pope Innocent X' ?

    Des Moines Art Center, Iowa / Via independent.co.uk
    Damien Hirst
    Paul Nash
    Tracey Emin
    Francis Bacon
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Francis Bacon (1909 – 1992)

    Francis Bacon is one of the most famous 20th Century British painters. He is known for his raw graphic style and distorted images of people. Margaret Thatcher described him as "that man who paints those dreadful paintings". Bacon turned traditional paintings of people inside out, with grotesquely distorted faces and twisted body parts. Some of his most famous artworks are inspired by old masters.

    Francis Bacon (1909 – 1992)
    Licensed under Fair use / Via en.wikipedia.org
  22. 22. Who painted 'Movement in Squares' ?

    Licensed under Fair use / Via en.wikipedia.org
    Damien Hirst
    Bridget Riley
    Sarah Lucas
    Tracey Emin
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Bridget Louise Riley (1931 - )

    One of the foremost exponents of op art, works which are abstract works typically they give the viewer the impression of movement, hidden images, flashing and vibrating patterns, or of swelling or warping. Riley has been given honorary doctorates by both Oxford and Cambridge. In 2003, she was awarded the Praemium Imperiale and in 1998 she became one of only 65 Companions of Honour in Britain. As a board member of the National Gallery in the 1980s, she blocked Margaret Thatcher's plan to give an adjoining piece of property over to developers and thus helped ensure the eventual construction of the museum's Sainsbury Wing

    Bridget Louise Riley (1931 - )
    Via standard.co.uk
  23. 23. Who painted 'Zinc Sulphate' ?

    Via telegraph.co.uk
    Damien Hirst
    Bridget Riley
    Sarah Lucas
    Tracey Emin
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Damien Hirst (1965 - )

    Hirst is an artist, entrepreneur and art collector. He is the most prominent member of the group known as the Young British Artists, who dominated the art scene in the UK during the 1990s.He is internationally renowned and is reportedly the United Kingdom's richest living artist, with his wealth valued at £215m in the 2010 Sunday Times Rich List. He became famous for a series of artworks in which dead animals (including a shark, a sheep and a cow) are preserved sometimes having been dissected in formaldehyde.

    Damien Hirst (1965 - )
    Christian Görmer. Licensed under CC / Via en.wikipedia.org
  24. 24. Who painted 'No Women No Cry' ?

    Tate, London / Via en.wikipedia.org
    Chris Ofili
    Sarah Lucas
    Faisal Abdu'allah
    Anish Kapoor
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Chris Ofili (1968 - )

    Chris Ofili is one of the Young British Artists and won the Turner Prize in 1998. The artist’s early paintings combined paint, glitter, collaged images and elephant dung. More recent works adopt simple, pared-down forms while continuing to be just as expansive, dramatic and romantic – full of references to sensuality, sexuality and his ongoing exploration of biblical themes.

    Chris Ofili (1968 - )
    Victoria Miro Gallery / Via nationalgallery.org.uk*/viewPage/2

How Much Do You Know About British Art?

Oh Dear.

That really was a poor score, I think you'd better give up on art and stick to looking at pictures of cats on the internet.

Oh Dear.
Svetlana Petrova / Via demilked.com
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No joy here.

Sir, your result was about the same as guessing. I am not impressed.

No joy here.
Rhoda Holmes Nicholls / Via en.wikipedia.org
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Not bad!

Unlike the behaviour of Signor Berlusconi, your result was nothing to be ashamed of. Keep visiting art galleries and you'll soon have the skills to spot a Banksy at a bunga bunga party.

Not bad!
Jonathan Yeo / Via jonathanyeo.com
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Chin chin!

You may treat yourself to a cheeky drink my good sir, your score was very good indeed. An afternoon spent in an art gallery with you would be an absolute pleasure!

Chin chin!
Musée du Louvre, Paris / Via thegolovine.wordpress.com
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Magnifique!

I humbly bow to your greatness, oh Mistress of the visual arts. There isn't much you don't know about British painting. Perhaps it was one of the modern works that caused you your slight hiccup?

Magnifique!
The Hermitage, St. Petersburg / Via thegolovine.wordpress.com
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Perfect!

Just like Tony Hart, there is nothing that you don't know about British painting. Well done!

Perfect!
Tony Hart / Via express.co.uk
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