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    Updated on Oct 13, 2019. Posted on Aug 17, 2018

    19 Teacher Instagram Hacks That Will Make This School Year The Best One Yet

    Just a few ways to save your money, time, and patience.

    1. Use hot glue and painter's tape to hang posters without damaging the walls.

    2. Wedge a roll of toilet paper into a candle holder and take out the cardboard so you don't have to buy your own Kleenex.

    3. Get a bunch of paint chips from Home Depot to teach colors, spelling, and even homonyms!

    4. Separate crayons by color into drawers so they can quickly pick out the one they need.

    5. Label a shoe organizer to store their headphones, water bottles, or school supplies.

    6. Make reading guides out of laminate strips and highlighter tape to help students that are easily distracted.

    7. Cut composition notebooks in half, since kids never usually use the whole page anyway.

    8. Cut erasers in half with a utility knife and write numbers on them so your students know whose is whose.

    9. Glue pompoms to marker caps so each student has their own eraser when using the whiteboards.

    10. Lay letters on clear tape to hang them on your bulletin board without stressing over the placement.

    11. Bring their scissors home so you can give them a rinse in the dishwasher.

    12. Save the caps when the glue runs out so you have a spare on hand when one gets lost.

    13. Store glue in plastic containers with a sponge so you don't have to rely on finicky squeeze bottles.

    14. Sort out the dull pencils so the kids don't have to dig through the stash to find a sharp one.

    15. Hang clothespins so students can claim their homework.

    16. Reinforce the lids of crayon boxes with duct tape and unclog all of your glue tops with vegetable oil.

    17. Write names directly on the desks with oil-based Sharpie marker so you don't have to fuss over name tags.

    18. Frame this template to keep track of the things you always forget.

    19. Stick push lights on the wall to remind students how loudly or quietly they should be working.