This German Children's Book Is The Creepiest Thing You'll See Today

    "...and then the tailor cut the little boy's thumbs off. Good night."

    In case you didn't know, Germany has a collection of really creepy bedtime stories called Struwwelpeter.

    Heinrich Hoffmann / Via de.wikipedia.org

    The title can be translated as "Shockheaded Peter" or "Slovenly Peter."

    The book contains a series of stories where children behave carelessly or naughtily. This leads to drastic consequences, which range from falling into water to death. Yes, death!

    Heinrich Hoffmann / Via de.wikisource.org

    These are some of the extremely disturbing stories:

    "Struwwelpeter" describes a boy who does not groom himself properly and is consequently unpopular.

    Heinrich Hoffmann / Via gutenberg.org

    In "Die gar traurige Geschichte mit dem Feuerzeug" ("The Dreadful Story of the Matches"), a girl plays with matches and burns to death.

    Heinrich Hoffmann / Via gutenberg.org

    In "Die Geschichte von den schwarzen Buben" ("The Story of the Black Boys"), "Nikolas" catches three boys teasing a dark-skinned boy. To teach them a lesson, he dips the three boys into black ink.

    Heinrich Hoffmann / Via gutenberg.org

    In "Die Geschichte vom Daumenlutscher" ("The Story of the Thumb-Sucker"), a mother warns her son not to suck his thumbs. However, when she leaves the house he resumes his thumb sucking, until a roving tailor appears and cuts off his thumbs with giant scissors.

    Heinrich Hoffmann / Via gutenberg.org

    "Die Geschichte vom Suppen-Kaspar" ("The Story of the Soup-Kaspar") begins as Augustus, a healthy, strong boy, proclaims that he will no longer eat his soup. Over the next five days he wastes away and dies.

    Heinrich Hoffmann / Via gutenberg.org

    "Die Geschichte von Hans Guck-in-die-Luft" ("The Story of Johnny Head-in-Air") is about a boy who habitually fails to watch where he's walking. One day he walks into a river; he is soon rescued, but his school bag drifts away.

    Heinrich Hoffmann / Via gutenberg.org

    These stories were written and illustrated by the German physician and psychiatrist Heinrich Hoffmann.

    Heinrich Hoffmann / Via de.wikisource.org

    Hoffmann wrote Struwwelpeter in response to a lack of good children's books. Intending to buy a picture book as a Christmas present for his 3-year-old son, Hoffmann instead wrote and illustrated his own book, which he published in 1845.

    Heinrich Hoffmann / Via en.wikipedia.org

    Struwwelpeter is one of the most successful German children's books and has been translated into more than 45 languages.

    Heinrich Hoffmann / Via fathersforlife.org

    The English version is actually translated by Mark Twain.

    Good night. Sleep tight.