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    Posted on Aug. 29, 2016

    13 Historical Sites In Canada That Will Bring Out Your Inner Indiana Jones

    Who says we're too young to have history?

    1. L’Anse aux Meadows — Newfoundland.

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    Explore the 1000-year-old ruins of a Viking settlement. You'll actually walk on land where Vikings once stood as their longboats struck the shores of Newfoundland. And, so you can really get a feel for Viking life, there's an interpretive centre, a long house, and a recreated port of trade.

    2. Old Québec — Québec

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    Take a stroll back in time down cobble-stoned streets lined with centuries-old buildings. Québec City was founded in 1608, so there's plenty of Canadian history to be soaked up here — with a good dose of European flair.

    3. Fortress of Louisbourg — Nova Scotia

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    A trip to the Fortress of Louisbourg is kind of like time travel without needing that bulky time-machine. It's a National Historic Site as well as a living historical village — meaning it's interactive. Actors roam the dirt roads dressed in 18th-century garb and you can eat at authentic 18th century restaurants.

    4. SGang Gwaay — British Columbia

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    SGang Gwaay (Nan Sdins), a UNESCO World Heritage Site, is what remains of a once-vibrant Haida community. Tour the ruins of the village, including house framework and the breathtaking mortuary and memorial poles.

    5. Dawson City — Yukon

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    You may be a little late for the gold rush, but you can still feel like you're in the heart of it all in Dawson City. It's a modern community today, but maintains its historic roots with 19th century buildings, museums, and tours. If you're a fan of the Bard of the Yukon, don't miss a trip to Robert Service's cabin.

    6. Head-Smashed-In Buffalo Jump — Alberta

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    Venture to the prairies to see one of the world's oldest buffalo jumps. The native people of the North American plains used buffalo jumps as a hunting method for over 6,000 years. Aside from its archeological value, the site also offers a gorgeous view of the plains.

    7. Fort Rodd Hill and Fisgard Lighthouse — British Columbia

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    Fort Rodd Hill gives a unique glimpse into Victoria's military past. The coastal artillery fort dates from the late 19th century and still boasts original buildings to explore.

    8. The Ottawa Jail Hostel — Ontario

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    This hostel was originally the Carleton County Gaol, and you can still tour the former jail's "death row." If you're feeling particularly adventurous, you can spend the night in this supposedly haunted hostel.

    9. The Banff Springs Hotel — Alberta

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    The "Castle in the Rockies" was built as a railroad hotel in 1888. Its majestic surroundings are mirrored in the hotel's grand staircases, chandeliers, and ornate artwork. Feel like Canadian royalty for a night with a stay in this Scottish Baronial-style castle.

    10. Batoche — Saskatchewan

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    The village of Batoche was the site of the Battle of Batoche, the battle saw the defeat of Louis Riel. It was a Métis settlement and the original church still stands, though punctured with bullet holes.

    11. Lower Fort Garry — Manitoba

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    Another example of a living historical village, Lower Fort Garry has a rich fur trader history. It was an early Hudson's Bay Company trading post and was also the site of the formation of important treaties the crown and local First Nations people. You can spend an entire day steeped in history discovering the site.

    12. Casa Loma — Ontario

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    This majestic Canadian castle sits in the city of Toronto and offers a peek at the good life in the early 20th century. The opulent once-private home is now open to visitors for tours and event bookings.

    13. Green Gables — Prince Edward Island

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    Yes, literature lovers, this IS the place that inspired L.M. Montgomery to write her beloved Anne of Green Gables series. You can tour the house and visit places featured in the books.

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