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Posted on Jul 22, 2016

Test Your Bullshit Detector With This Week’s Fake News Quiz

Can you separate the true news stories from the fake ones?

  1. A 91-year-old woman filled out a crossword at a museum and later realized it was a valuable piece of art.

    Thinkstock
    Correct! 
    Wrong! 

    It's true.

    The woman was visiting a museum in Germany and thought that "Reading-work-piece," by artist Arthur Koepcke, was part of an interactive display. "Museum officials say they believe the work can be restored and said the woman was reported for insurance reasons," according to the BBC.

  2. Correct! 
    Wrong! 

    It's false.

    This is a hoax from World News Daily Report, a site the publishes completely fake articles.

    Via Thinkstock
  3. A 300-pound security robot knocked over and injured a 16-month-old boy in Silicon Valley.

    Correct! 
    Wrong! 

    It's true.

    The parents say they were shopping at the Stanford Shopping Center when the robot knocked their son over. "The robot hit my son's head and he fell down facing down on the floor and the robot did not stop and it kept moving forward," Tiffany Teng, the boy's mother, told ABC7News.com.

    Via ABC7News.com
  4. A satanic prayer was said at the beginning of a council meeting in Pensacola, Florida.

    Correct! 
    Wrong! 

    It's true.

    Aa member of the local Satanic Temple, David Suhor, was allowed to give an invocation at the beginning of a council meeting as an expression of religious freedom. Police had to remove several people from the chamber due to protests, according to WEAR TV, a local station.

  5. Correct! 
    Wrong! 

    It's false.

    This was a fake story from National Report, a website that publishes hoax articles. Palin was never banned.

  6. People swarmed a highway in California to catch a rare Pokémon.

    Correct! 
    Wrong! 

    It's false.

    The footage is actually from a Black Lives Matter protest that occurred earlier in the month. But lots of people in different countries keep sharing the footage and saying it's a result of Pokémon Go.

  7. Trump said this to People magazine in 1998:

    Correct! 
    Wrong! 

    It's false.

    This quote has been shared widely online, but the magazine searched its archive and confirmed he never said it.

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