Politics

Texas Governor Proposes Nine Amendments To The U.S. Constitution

“Now it is Texas’s turn,” Gov. Greg Abbott writes, proposing an amendment that would allow a two-third vote of the states to overrule Supreme Court decisions.

Texas Republican Governor Greg Abbott Saul Loeb / AFP / Getty Images

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott is going big in the new year — calling for the states to come together to add nine amendments to the United States Constitution.

Under the Constitution, “the legislatures of two thirds of the several states” can “call a convention for proposing amendments,” and Abbott is proposing that the time has come to do so.

“There have been many casualties in Washington, D.C.’s war on the rule of
law,” the 90-page document explains. “But perhaps no one has lost as much as the States.”

Restoring the Rule of Law With States Leading the Way” details his plan.

“Now it is Texas’s turn.”

Here, per the document, are the nine constitutional amendments Abbott is backing:

I. Prohibit Congress from regulating activity that occurs wholly within one
State.

II. Require Congress to balance its budget.

III. Prohibit administrative agencies—and the unelected bureaucrats that
staff them—from creating federal law.

IV. Prohibit administrative agencies—and the unelected bureaucrats that
staff them—from preempting state law.

V. Allow a two-thirds majority of the States to override a U.S. Supreme
Court decision.

VI. Require a seven-justice super-majority vote for U.S. Supreme Court
decisions that invalidate a democratically enacted law.

VII. Restore the balance of power between the federal and state governments by limiting the former to the powers expressly delegated to it in the Constitution.

VIII. Give state officials the power to sue in federal court when federal officials overstep their bounds.

IX. Allow a two-thirds majority of the States to override a federal law or regulation.

After the convention envisioned by the Constitution for proposing the amendments would be held, then three fourths of the states — through the state legislatures or through state conventions — would need to ratify the amendments.



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Chris Geidner is the legal editor for BuzzFeed News and is based in Washington, D.C. In 2014, Geidner won the National Lesbian & Gay Journalists Association award for journalist of the year.
Contact Chris Geidner at chris.geidner@buzzfeed.com.
 
 

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