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    11 People On Why They Joined The Women's March On London

    "It's in our hands to create the future we want. It's not just going to happen on its own. That's why we're here."

    Tens of thousands of people took to the streets of London on Saturday as part of a global protest on the first day of Donald Trump's presidency. BuzzFeed News asked some of them why."

    Gilly Hatch, 73

    Chris Bethell / BuzzFeed News

    Why are you here today?

    "I'm here to protest against Donald Trump's plans for his presidency."

    What do you hope the march demonstrates?

    "That people won't accept what he has in mind – simple, really. We need to start protesting and carry on protesting throughout his presidency."

    Will this change anything?

    "We'll have to see. I have no idea. This is one small part of what needs to happen over the next four years. We need to carry on with this."

    Andrew, 34

    Chris Bethell / BuzzFeed News

    Why are you here today?

    "I am here as a show of solidarity with the people standing up for progressive causes. There's really much more to the USA than Donald Trump, now and always. This is the point where we start building a better future by standing up for what we believe in."

    What do you hope the march demonstrates?

    "I think it demonstrates support for women's rights, support for minority rights, you know? Support for progressive causes in general. I believe we need to be active as citizens of the USA, citizens of the UK, citizens of the world to build the future we want for ourselves."

    Do you believe this will change anything?

    "Yes, I do actually. I think it will change things because this is only the beginning, it's not the end. We won't go home today, back to our normal lives, and forget about this. This is the start of a movement which is really going to make an important difference. It's been a really sad outcome, out of what has happened last year with Trump and Brexit, but if there can be any silver lining out of it, it's that people are becoming aware that it's in our hands to create the future we want. It's not just going to happen on its own. That's why we're here."

    Liberty, 26

    Chris Bethell / BuzzFeed News

    Why are you here today?

    "Because I don't think women are speaking up enough for themselves. Especially in today's climate there is a lot of fear – if we band together, then they do have to take notice. If there are thousands or maybe millions of us, then I think we have a louder voice."

    What do you hope the march demonstrates?

    "I hope it demonstrates that women actually love each other. People don't realise that enough – we love each other and we will stand together. Across the globe, not just for my rights in England, but for women's rights in America and all across the world."

    Will this change anything?

    "I hope it at least creates a shift in our attitude at the grassroots level. I don't know if Trump is going to back on everything he has said and done, but it's the beginning. It has to come from us as the people."

    Takiyah Duncan-Jones, 20, & Issey Clarke, 18

    Chris Bethell / BuzzFeed News

    Why are you here today?

    Issey: "Because Trump's a dickhead."

    Takiyah: "Yeah, to put across the point that we're not changing shit just because of him."

    Issey: "And to show that it's not just America that his absolute bollocks is going to affect."

    What do you hope the march demonstrates?

    Takiyah: "Solidarity. The fact that we're all going to stick together and not let his political, fascist, disgusting views affect us."

    Will this change anything?

    Issey: "It may not change anything but it will show that people care and that the younger generation also care. I think we're often seen as being disengaged with politics, but obviously the fact that we're here, and many people younger than us, too, there's enough people here to show that something should be done."

    Takiyah: "Yeah, it may not change anything directly, but potentially indirectly. It's spreading awareness as well of what could possibly be the repercussions of Trump's actions. This is really important for women and ethnic minorities."

    Laura Gwen Miles, 25

    Chris Bethell / BuzzFeed News

    Why are you here today?

    "I'm here today to demonstrate with my menstrual art activist group, The Menstronauts. We are here to assign ourselves to the rest of the people that want global protection, the protection of human rights of women."

    What do you hope the march demonstrates?

    "I hope that the march is a visual demonstration of how many people are affected by these laws which are constantly fought for and all of the rights that are fought to be maintained. It's an ocean of people who are unhappy with the results of the election. And Donald Trump is a disgusting man. A lot of people here obviously disagree with statements he has made about reproductive rights, immigration, and his policies on climate change."

    Will this change anything?

    "I think these protests exist for a reason. This is a way that any man or woman can make their own statement. I'm all about these [grassroots] movements coming together in these moments of unease."

    Danielle Walker, 43

    Chris Bethell / BuzzFeed News

    Why are you here today?

    "I am here because for me Trump's inauguration represents the culmination of a year of the politics of hate. I'm so proud to be marching with everybody – on all continents now! Because we know now that there is a march going on in Antarctica, so that's all continents. That's pretty epic."

    What do you hope the march demonstrates?

    "That men, women, girls, boys – everyone in between, whatever they want to call themselves – are together, united, against the politics of hate. This affects all of us. This is about austerity, this is about fear, and this is not what we need in the world. We need to be united."

    Will this change anything?

    "I hope so. This needs to be the start of a movement. This can't be 'Oh we've had a nice day, let's go home now'. I think we need to go home and we have to make changes in where we live. This affects everywhere around the world. We can build on this momentum."

    Tangy Morgan, 57

    Chris Bethell / BuzzFeed News

    Why are you here today?

    "I'm here to voice my solidarity for folks who are looking for equality for all. I'm an American living in London, and I thought since I won't be in DC, I had to do something today. That's why I'm here."

    What do you hope the march demonstrates?

    "I hope it demonstrates to President Trump and his fellow cohorts that the world is watching him. What he says and what he tweets has repercussions now. He's no longer in campaign mode, he's the president of the United States and he should start acting presidential. He should understand that people are watching him and what he says has implications globally."

    Will this change anything?

    "I'm hoping that it will change things. I'm saying 50/50 there because there are some people who have staunch views, and others who are not so. I hope it sends a message though, and people need to be heard."

    Jessica Ashman, 31

    Chris Bethell / BuzzFeed News

    Why are you here today?

    "I'm here to represent women of colour, and feminist women from working-class backgrounds that oppose Trump. Also these women are often underrepresented in marches, so as someone who identifies as so, I'm trying to make my mark. And also, it's a nice vibe, it's pretty chilled."

    What do you hope the march demonstrates?

    "Well, I was talking to my friend and she said, 'What's the point?' and I think it's a good way of showing your anger and resistance. It's causing a disruption. It may not make a change immediately, but it's chipping away at the block of fascism."

    Will this change anything?

    "I hope so. I think it needs to continue. It's not just one jolly day, but something that happens perpetually. I think as Trump's policies start to roll out, and he's in office, people will likely want to get involved in action as it will be affecting them. "

    Lucy Wills (said her age is a state secret)

    Chris Bethell / BuzzFeed News

    Why are you here today?

    "I'm here because I believe that if you can march and protest, then you should. Many people around the world can't. It's really important we tell people how we feel and that we show just because someone is in a position of power, it doesn't mean we don't have power as well."

    What do you hope the march demonstrates?

    "That people really care. That people are willing to give up their time, to be creative and to channel their anger and their frustration into something really positive that can actually cause change. The huge Stop the War march, it didn't stop the war, but what it did was tell the world that what our government was doing was not in our name. And that was hugely important. This is very much the same thing. We're coming up against our political systems. The popular vote did not win the election. There are lots of different challenges."

    Will this change anything?

    "I think people are starting to realise that we're inheriting systems and culture that never really worked for anyone and doesn't work for anybody now. It's about time we replaced it with something more human."

    Rabindra Singh, 40

    Chris Bethell / BuzzFeed News

    Why are you here today?

    "I'm here supporting and in protest. There are multiple reasons. Firstly, I'm a feminist. This simply means equality of opportunity. In this day and age it's mad that we haven't achieved that. Secondly, there's a man called Trump and his attitudes to women – what he's said about women is totally appalling. And I don't share the view that just because someone wins the vote democratically, you can't object to them. Very unpopular people have won votes in history and that's when you stand up. I was here protesting the Iraq War and I think the eyes of history now sees the people present at that were in the right. I want people to remember that we were here protesting Donald Trump."

    What do you hope the march demonstrates?

    "It's very easy to get depressed post-Brexit and post-Trump. But it shows that these votes were split nearly 50/50. It shows that there is another side to the argument – a positive one. When you look at some of these placards and the people getting together, you see it's about unity and love. To a lot of people that could look like hippy BS, but I think a lot of people need reassurance that there is hope and there is a movement in the opposite direction that they're free to join."

    Do you believe this will change anything?

    "I do. For one simple reason. When I was here for the anti-Iraq War demo, there was a million or so people here that day. Tony Blair chose to ignore them. Before that he was an extremely popular politician, and the fundamental tipping point in his career was when he parted with the people of the country. He followed Bush into something very unpopular. So if I was Theresa May, or any of the other politicians watching this, I would think that to ignore this would be at their own peril."


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