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How Much Do You Actually Know About Vaginas?

Are you a certified ~vagenius~? Take the quiz to find out.

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    Robyn Mackenzie via Thinkstock / Getty
    Robyn Mackenzie via Thinkstock / Getty
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    The vulva is the exterior part of the female genitalia — it's basically everything you can see. The cervix is on the inside, whereas the vaginal opening, the labia majora, and the clitoris are all visible from the outside.

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    tr3gi for Thinkstock / Getty
    tr3gi for Thinkstock / Getty
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    The average vagina when unaroused is about 3 to 4 inches deep...but it can expand to roughly twice that size during sex! More on that here.

  3. 3. True or false?

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    Fuse for Thinkstock / Getty
    Fuse for Thinkstock / Getty
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    You can’t tell if a person is a virgin by doing a hymen check. Some people aren’t born with hymens, and some people’s hymens break or go away before they ever have sex (like by inserting tampons, going horseback riding, and for other reasons). Along those lines, some women bleed the first time they have sex, but not everyone does. So checking to see if a woman has bled after sex is ALSO not a good way to tell if she was a virgin.

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    David Corneliu for Thinkstock / Getty
    David Corneliu for Thinkstock / Getty
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    In a nationally representative study of 3,800 women between the ages of 18 and 60, roughly half the women said they'd ever used a vibrator for masturbation, and 20% said they'd used one within the past month.

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    dtv2 for Thinkstock / Getty
    dtv2 for Thinkstock / Getty
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    YEP. This is according to a study of 6,151 men and women who were asked to self-report how often they have orgasms. Lesbian women reported more orgasms than straight women and bisexual women. One possible theory is that straight and bisexual women may spend disproportionately more time focusing primarily on penetration, while lesbian women may participate in a greater range of sex acts during sex. Other research has shown that the greater number of sex acts that happen during a sexual encounter, the more likely it is for a woman to reach orgasm (meaning that you have better odds with oral + manual stimulation + penetration than with penetration alone, for instance, since you're looking at three sex acts vs. just one). More on all that here and here.

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    Purestock for Thinkstock / Getty
    Purestock for Thinkstock / Getty
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    IUDs and implants are both more than 99% effective at preventing pregnancy — better than any other method. That said, they don't protect you against STIs, so be sure to get tested and communicate about safe sex with your partner. Learn about the many different types of birth control here.

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    Stockbyte for Thinkstock / Getty
    Stockbyte for Thinkstock / Getty
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    You should wait at least six weeks to have penetrative sex after giving birth (or longer than that if you’re still feeling pain or discomfort). The six-week window has to do with how long you typically need to heal to avoid infection. But you can engage in other non-penetrative sexual activities before six weeks, if you’re really up to it and careful about it. More on that here.

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    maury75 for Thinkstock / Getty
    maury75 for Thinkstock / Getty
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    Even if you’ve had a C-section, you'll still need to wait at least six weeks before you have sex — the point is to reduce your risk of infection and allow your body time to heal.

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    tamara_kulikova for Thinkstock / Getty
    tamara_kulikova for Thinkstock / Getty
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    You may think of the clitoris as the small visible button-shaped part that you can (sometimes) see. But research indicates that the clitoris might have branches that extend down underneath the skin, along each side of the vulva, kind of in a wishbone shape.

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    Saiva Liepiņa for Thinkstock / Getty
    Saiva Liepiņa for Thinkstock / Getty
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    People don’t pee out their vaginas. They pee from their urethras. More on that here.

    Alice Mongkongllite for BuzzFeed / Via buzzfeed.com
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    Purestock for Thinkstock / Getty
    Purestock for Thinkstock / Getty
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    Vaginas are self-cleaning, and they definitely don’t need to be “pH balanced” by douching. In fact, douching can be incredibly bad for vaginal health — there’s an association between douching and pelvic inflammatory disease, which is an infection that can lead to scarring, ectopic pregnancy, and infertility. Douching can even leave you more susceptible to STDs. Learn how to clean your vagina PROPERLY here.

 
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