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You're Only Allowed To Sleep If You Can Pass This Quiz

Don't snooze or you'll lose.

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  1. 1. How much sleep do adults need each night, according to the National Sleep Foundation?

    digitalskillet / Thinkstock
    Correct
    Incorrect
    4–6 hours
    Correct
    Incorrect
    7–9 hours
    Correct
    Incorrect
    10–12 hours
    Correct
    Incorrect
    13–17 hours
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Adults need 7–9 hours of sleep each night!

    Research shows that adults (ages 24 to 64) need this much sleep to maintain overall health. However, the exact amount an adult needs can vary depending on lifestyle factors like work schedule, illness, and stress, which affect the quality and quantity of sleep they get.

    Adults need 7–9 hours of sleep each night! Tap to play GIF Tap to play GIF
    Via HBO / Giphy
  2. 2. How much sleep do infants aged 3-12 months need each night?

    AKIRA / amanaimagesRF / Thinkstock
    Correct
    Incorrect
    4–6 hours
    Correct
    Incorrect
    8–10 hours
    Correct
    Incorrect
    12–15 hours
    Correct
    Incorrect
    19–23 hours
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Infants need 12–15 hours of sleep each night!

    That's a lot of sleep! And there's no guarantee that infants will sleep for that long without crying breaks. Find out more about the sleep needs of babies and toddlers here.

    Infants need 12–15 hours of sleep each night!
    Via Nickelodeon / Tumblr
  3. 3. Which of the following is known as the ~sleep hormone~?

    Tap to play GIF Tap to play GIF
    Ted Ed / Tumblr
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Dopamine
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Seratonin
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Melatonin
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Oxytocin
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Melatonin is the sleep hormone!

    Melatonin decreases alertness and makes you feel sleepy. It's made in the brain's pineal gland, which gets "turned off" during the day when there's sunlight. It turns back on at night when it gets dark. You can also buy synthetic melatonin pills if you find out your body has trouble producing its own.

    Melatonin is the sleep hormone!
    Via aquarius83men / Thinkstock
  4. 4. Humans spend up to ______ of their lives asleep.

    Tap to play GIF Tap to play GIF
    Cartoon Network / Giphy
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Via zak00 / Thinkstock
    One-fifth (1/5)
    Via zak00 / Thinkstock
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Via zak00 / Thinkstock
    One-third (1/3)
    Via zak00 / Thinkstock
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Via zak00 / Thinkstock
    One-half (1/2)
    Via zak00 / Thinkstock
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Humans spend up to one-third of their lives asleep!

    Spending nearly 35% of your life asleep might sound like a lot of lost time, but you need sufficient sleep to survive — just like you need food and water.

    Humans spend up to one-third of their lives asleep!
    Via One Direction / Tumblr
  5. 5. True or false: Alcohol makes you sleep deeper and longer.

    Peter-Braakmann / Thinkstock
    Correct
    Incorrect
    True
    Correct
    Incorrect
    False
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    False — alcohol does not help you sleep!

    Alcohol may help you fall asleep faster because of its relaxing effect, but it harms both the quality and quantity of sleep you get. Booze disrupts stages of deep sleep (specifically REM), making your overall sleep less restful. That means you'll feel more tired the next day, and if you have insomnia or sleep apnea, it could make it worse.

    False — alcohol does not help you sleep! Tap to play GIF Tap to play GIF
    Via Nickelodeon / Giphy
  6. 6. Which one of these foods could mess with your sleep if you eat it close to bedtime?

    AnaBGD / Thinkstock
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Via bhofack2 / Thinkstock
    Fruit salad
    Via bhofack2 / Thinkstock
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Via Miroha141 / Thinkstock
    Fries and ketchup
    Via Miroha141 / Thinkstock
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Via tacar / Thinkstock
    Chocolate ice cream
    Via tacar / Thinkstock
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Via cobraphoto / Thinkstock
    Chips and salsa
    Via cobraphoto / Thinkstock
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Via bofhack2 / Thinkstock
    Fried Chicken
    Via bofhack2 / Thinkstock
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Via ekremguduk / Thinkstock
    All of these foods.
    Via ekremguduk / Thinkstock
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    All of the foods pictured could mess with your sleep!

    Fruit has natural sugars that get converted into energy, which could make it harder to fall asleep. Chocolate ice cream has a ton of sugar plus caffeine from the cocoa beans, which can keep you up, too. Finally, greasy, acidic, or spicy foods can increase acid reflux, especially when you're digesting laying down. The reflux and indigestion makes it harder to fall asleep and stay asleep.

    All of the foods pictured could mess with your sleep! Tap to play GIF Tap to play GIF
    Via The Disney Channel / tumblr
  7. 7. What is sleep apnea?

    chameleonseye / Thinkstock
    Correct
    Incorrect
    When you only breathe out of your nose during sleep.
    Correct
    Incorrect
    When you have seizures in your sleep.
    Correct
    Incorrect
    When you move around so much in your sleep that it results in falling or injury.
    Correct
    Incorrect
    When you stop breathing or take very shallow breaths during sleep.
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Sleep apnea is when your breathing pauses or you take shallow breaths during sleep.

    According to the National Institutes of Health (NIH), these pauses can last from a few seconds to several minutes, AND they can happen up to 30 times an hour! When the person tries to breathe normally again, they often choke or snort loudly, which can wake them (and their bed partner) — so it can be very disruptive to sleep.

    Sleep apnea is when your breathing pauses or you take shallow breaths during sleep. Tap to play GIF Tap to play GIF
    Via FOX / says.com
  8. 8. Is your body temperature higher or lower during sleep?

    Creatas Images / Thinkstock
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Higher
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Lower
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Neither — it stays the same.
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Your body temperature is lower during sleep!

    Body temperature is a very important part of sleep regulation. Your core body temperature drops to help you fall asleep, and it reaches its lowest point in a 24-hour day during the deep sleep stage of sleep. So, sleeping in a cold room can actually help you snooze!

    Your body temperature is lower during sleep! Tap to play GIF Tap to play GIF
    Via Nickelodeon / reactiongifs.com
  9. 9. Sleep loss can cause which of the following?

    Tap to play GIF Tap to play GIF
    Disney / Tumblr
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Impaired driving
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Irritability
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Poor decision-making
    Correct
    Incorrect
    All of the above
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Sleep loss can cause impaired driving, irritability, and poor decision-making!

    Sleep is essential for proper mental and physical functioning. Studies show that driving while sleep-deprived is almost as bad as driving drunk. Sleep loss can also worsen your mood and put you at a higher risk of depression. Finally, it has a huge impact on cognitive tasks like concentration and problem-solving.

    Sleep loss can cause impaired driving, irritability, and poor decision-making!
    Via YouTube / Tumblr
  10. 10. What are circadian rhythms?

    Tap to play GIF Tap to play GIF
    Pokémon / giphy
    Correct
    Incorrect
    The pattern of vibrations throughout the brain during sleep.
    Correct
    Incorrect
    The chirping rhythms that crickets make at night.
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Changes in your heartbeat during different stages of sleep.
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Changes in the body over a 24-hour period, controlled by our internal biological clock.
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Our circadian rhythms are mental and physical changes in the body controlled by our biological clocks!

    Circadian rhythms tell us when to fall asleep and when to wake up over the course of a 24-hour day, helping you to maintain a sleep routine. They are controlled by our body's "internal clock" as well as external cues like daylight, meal times, and sounds. You can disrupt circadian rhythms by changing time zones — called "jet lag" — or by pulling all-nighters.

    Our circadian rhythms are mental and physical changes in the body controlled by our biological clocks!
    Via exopixel / Thinkstock
  11. 11. How many different stages of sleep are there in a normal sleep cycle?

    PaulMaguire / Thinkstock
    Correct
    Incorrect
    One
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Five
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Twelve
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Twenty-four
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    There are five stages of sleep.

    They are: stage one (light sleep), stage two (sleep onset), stages three and four (deep sleep), and REM sleep. One full sleep cycle lasts about 90 to 110 minutes. Your body alternates between stages one through four (the non-REM sleep stages) and the REM sleep stage throughout the night. NREM sleep makes up 75% (about 65 minutes) of your sleep cycle and it's the most restorative.

    There are five stages of sleep.
    Via Ryhor Bruyeu / Thinkstock
  12. 12. What does "REM" stand for in the REM sleep stage?

    thegoodphoto / Thinkstock
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Rapid eye movement
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Resting endocrine motility
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Rapid external motion
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Resting eye movement
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    "REM" stands for rapid eye movement.

    You enter REM sleep about 90 minutes after you fall asleep, and go into it every 90 minutes, alternating with the non-REM cycles. REM sleep periods get longer later in the night. During REM, your eyes move back and forth rapidly while the body supplies energy to the brain, which helps mental activities the next day.

    "REM" stands for rapid eye movement. Tap to play GIF Tap to play GIF
    Via youtube.com / dafinaislami.tumblr.com
  13. 13. At which stage of sleep does most dreaming occur?

    Jenny Chang / BuzzFeed
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Stages three and four (deep sleep)
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Stage two (sleep onset)
    Correct
    Incorrect
    REM sleep
    Correct
    Incorrect
    No single stage
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Most dreaming occurs during REM sleep!

    Dreaming is a complicated process. But scientists do know that during REM sleep, the brain is most active. Certain signals activate parts of the brain involved in processing and storing information, memories, and images — all of these make up our dreams. Overall, dreams are a strange and personal experience.

    Most dreaming occurs during REM sleep!
    Via Cartoon Network / Tumblr
  14. 14. Insufficient sleep and insomnia are more common in _______.

    Daniel Hurst / Thinkstock
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Women
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Men
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Neither
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    These are more common in women!

    There is growing research from the NIH that shows insufficient sleep and insomnia are more prevalent among women. Theories suggest it could be due to a difference in hormones, the effects of pregnancy, or other lifestyle factors.

    These are more common in women!
    Via grinvalds / Thinkstock
  15. 15. True or false: You can make up for lost sleep during the weekend.

    golubovy / Thinkstock
    Correct
    Incorrect
    True
    Correct
    Incorrect
    False
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    You can't make up for lost sleep on the weekends!

    According to the NIH, the body's internal processes (like your biological clock, hormones, etc) make it impossible to get used to significantly less sleep than your body needs. If you lose sleep several nights in a row, you acquire a "sleep debt," which affects brain function, cardiovascular health, and energy levels. Sleeping late on the weekends won't repay the debt or its toll on the body — you'll need many nights, or even a whole week, of optimal sleep to catch up.

    You can't make up for lost sleep on the weekends!
    Via SasinParaksa / Thinkstock
  16. 16. What is "sleep paralysis"?

    Chia-Hsin Ho / Creative Commons / Flickr
    Correct
    Incorrect
    When you can feel physical sensations (like falling or getting stabbed) during a nightmare.
    Correct
    Incorrect
    When you go into deep sleep with your eyes still partially open.
    Correct
    Incorrect
    When your body stays in deep sleep for too long and you stay sleeping for twice as long as normal.
    Correct
    Incorrect
    When your brain wakes up before your muscles and body wake up.
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Sleep paralysis is when your brain wakes up before your body and muscles wake up!

    During REM sleep, your voluntary muscles go into a state of paralysis, which prevents you from acting out your dreams and injuring yourself. During sleep paralysis, the body remains "paralyzed" in REM sleep but the brain wakes up and the eyes start to open. So you become semi-conscious, but you can't move any muscle or speak — this can last from seconds to minutes. Heart rate and breathing stay normal, so sleep paralysis won't kill you, but it's still scary AF.

    Sleep paralysis is when your brain wakes up before your body and muscles wake up! Tap to play GIF Tap to play GIF
    Via ABC / Giphy
 
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