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Do You Know What Happened In The News This Week?

A tragic counterterrorism operation. A migrant crisis in Europe. Total recall of delicious products. Take the BuzzFeed News Quiz, made from stories in the BuzzFeed News newsletter this week.

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  1. 1.

    The White House made a startling revelation in a statement released on Thursday: during a counterterrorism operation on the border of Afghanistan and Pakistan in January, the U.S. military made a tragic mistake. What did they do?
    Pablo Martinez Monsivais / AP

    The White House made a startling revelation in a statement released on Thursday: during a counterterrorism operation on the border of Afghanistan and Pakistan in January, the U.S. military made a tragic mistake. What did they do?

    They accidentally killed two Afghan civilians
    They accidentally freed an al-Qaeda leader
    They accidentally killed two hostages
    They accidentally set fire to crops and farmland
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    The operation accidentally killed two hostages.

    The hostages were Dr. Warren Weinstein, an American, and Giovanni Lo Porto, an Italian. They were aid workers in Pakistan when they were taken hostage by al-Qaeda in 2011 and 2012, respectively. The operation that killed the hostages involved a drone strike, according to a Wall Street Journal report (paywall). According to the Washington Post, at least eight Americans have been killed by drone strikes since 2002, and only one, Anwar al-Awlaki, was targeted intentionally. Read up on the whole scope of the story at BuzzFeed News.

  2. 2.

    A European crisis deepened this week involving multiple shipwrecks that have killed over a thousand people, many of which were refugees seeking to reach Europe to flee ongoing or worsening wars in their home countries. In what sea did the shipwrecks take place?
    Carmelo Imbesi / AP

    A European crisis deepened this week involving multiple shipwrecks that have killed over a thousand people, many of which were refugees seeking to reach Europe to flee ongoing or worsening wars in their home countries. In what sea did the shipwrecks take place?

    The Baltic Sea
    The Black Sea
    The Sargasso Sea
    The Mediterranean Sea
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    It's the Mediterranean Sea.

    There were several migrant shipwrecks across the Mediterranean — two off the Libyan coast, and one that ran aground near Greece. For more on the deepening crisis, check out this report by the Associated Press.

  3. 3.

    Loretta Lynch has finally been confirmed as the new U.S. attorney general this week after her confirmation was stalled for more than a month. Senate Republicans were using Lynch's nomination as part of political move to make gains on a completely unrelated legislation. What was the legislation about?
    Kevin Lamarque / Reuters

    Loretta Lynch has finally been confirmed as the new U.S. attorney general this week after her confirmation was stalled for more than a month. Senate Republicans were using Lynch's nomination as part of political move to make gains on a completely unrelated legislation. What was the legislation about?

    Immigration
    Human Trafficking
    Education Spending
    Campaign Finance
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    It's Human Trafficking.

    It was an anti-human trafficking bill that would create a fund to support victims. The bill was initially uncontroversial, but became a flashpoint after Republicans added language explicitly prohibiting the fund to pay for abortions — something that Democrats staunchly opposed. Read up on the Loretta Lynch vote with this piece by The Atlantic’s Russell Berman.

  4. 4.

    European Union regulators were in the news again this week after accusing another large company of abusing its market dominance to make unfair gains. What was the company being accused?
    Wikicommons

    European Union regulators were in the news again this week after accusing another large company of abusing its market dominance to make unfair gains. What was the company being accused?

    Allianz, the German financial services company
    Carrefour, the French supermarket retail company
    Enel, the Italian utility company
    Gazprom, the Russian oil company
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    It's Gazprom.

    EU regulators say Gazprom may have imposed unfair prices on Eastern Europe by artificially limiting its supply to central and eastern European countries. The critique comes a few days after a similar accusation made against Google. Check out the story in this Bloomberg piece about Gazprom.

  5. 5.

    Comcast's proposed merger with Time Warner Cable came to a screeching halt this week after a report suggesting the company's tendency towards anti-competitive behavior. The report described a 2013 incident where Comcast prevented the sale of a company — possibly for its gain. What was the company?
    Gene J. Puskar / AP

    Comcast's proposed merger with Time Warner Cable came to a screeching halt this week after a report suggesting the company's tendency towards anti-competitive behavior. The report described a 2013 incident where Comcast prevented the sale of a company — possibly for its gain. What was the company?

    Netflix
    Vimeo
    Crackle
    Hulu
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    It's Hulu.

    In 2013, Comcast convinced the co-owners of streaming service Hulu to not sell their company, arguing they could increase the streaming services' value. Due to a prior deal with the Justice Department, Comcast is severely limited in the amount of influence it is allowed to have over Hulu. Critics of the merger are concerned about the market implications — if the merger was successful, the combined company would control up to half of the country’s broadband Internet service. Catch up with the case on The Verge.

  6. 6.

    The NFL has received final approval to pay a $765 million settlement for a lawsuit filed by more than 4,500 former NFL players in 2013. What was the lawsuit claim?
    Gene Puskar / AP

    The NFL has received final approval to pay a $765 million settlement for a lawsuit filed by more than 4,500 former NFL players in 2013. What was the lawsuit claim?

    The league did not appropriately compensate players
    The league did not provide enough psychological counseling
    The league did not properly prepare players for financial stability after they retire
    The league did not adequately protect players from concussions and head injuries
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    The lawsuit was concussion-related.

    In 2013, more than 4,500 former NFL players sued the league for insufficiently protecting them against head injuries and concussions. “The total NFL payouts over 65 years, including interest and $112 million sought for lawyer fees, is expected to exceed $1 billion,” AP’s Maryclaire Dale writes.

  7. 7.

    Google unveiled its big plan to shake up the telecom market earlier this week — a wireless service that lets customers only pay for what they use. What is the service called?
    Google

    Google unveiled its big plan to shake up the telecom market earlier this week — a wireless service that lets customers only pay for what they use. What is the service called?

    Project Hi
    Project Pi
    Project Fi
    Project Io
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    It's called Project Fi.

    Customers will be charged a flat fee of $20 a month, plus another $10 for every 1GB of data used. Pretty big deal, for the right kind of the smartphone user. But don't get too excited just yet, though — you can only use the service if you have a Google Nexus 6 and you'll need an invitation... for now. Check out the story on BuzzFeed News.

  8. 8.

    So here's something bizarre: in 2013, Russian President Putin baffled President Obama when he proposed an aging action star as his choice intermediary between Moscow and Washington. Who is this action star?
    Jewel Samad / Getty Images

    So here's something bizarre: in 2013, Russian President Putin baffled President Obama when he proposed an aging action star as his choice intermediary between Moscow and Washington. Who is this action star?

    Jean-Claude Van Damme
    Steven Seagal
    Chuck Norris
    Arnold Schwarzenegger
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    It's Steven Seagal.

    Known for such B-movie hits like Half Past Dead and Fire Down Below, Seagal has developed a close relationship with Putin over the past few years. To learn more about this strange, but amazing, turn of events, check out BuzzFeed News' Max Seddon and Rosie Gray's investigation into the matter.

  9. 9.

    After an initial scare for hummus-lovers, fears about potential listeria contamination flared up against this week when not one, but two food companies pulled their products from shelves. Those two companies sold the same thing. What was it?
    Alexandra Wyman / AP

    After an initial scare for hummus-lovers, fears about potential listeria contamination flared up against this week when not one, but two food companies pulled their products from shelves. Those two companies sold the same thing. What was it?

    Ice Cream
    Butter
    Marzipan
    Cookie dough
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    It's Ice Cream.

    On Thursday, Jeni's Splendid Ice Cream recalled all of its products — including sorbets, frozen yogurts, ice creams, and ice cream sandwiches — from the market. On Monday, a company called Blue Bell did pretty much the same thing. They follow Sabra, the popular hummus brand, which recalled its products on April 2. Listeria is a bacterium that causes listeriosis — which is potentially lethal — and pregnant women, children, and those with weaker immune systems are particularly susceptible to the disease. Check out the story on BuzzFeed News.

Do You Know What Happened In The News This Week?

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