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Today Was China's National Haircut Day And These Kids Did It Right

It's supposed to be good luck to get your hair cut on the second day of the second month of the lunar calendar.

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Today is the biggest day of the year for two groups of people in China: barbers and children.

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That's because it's the day when hair care specialists can least afford to screw up: the second day of the second month in the Chinese lunar calendar.

The Chinese traditionally believe that to get their hair cut in the first month of the calendar will bring bad luck, so they hold off until this date.

The day is known as the "Longtaitou" festival, translating literally as "dragon rising its head," which marks the start of a new agriculture season and is believed to be auspicious for haircuts.

According to the Ministry of Commerce's Department of Trade in Services and Commercial Services, the country now has 590,000 registered barbers, who are welcoming a grueling workday after a long, slow month.

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However, for most kids, it's just known as "that time of the year again, man." Nobody really enjoys sitting on a chair and being warned "don't move or you'll get hurt by the scissors" when you're young.

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Also, on this day prices surge and the wait is long. Good luck and a good experience just can't be friends, it seems.

But for some kids, the day is one that they, well, love.

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Check out some of the ~sweet barbering skills~ on display here.

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Because who doesn't want a giant spider on their head?

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Some of the follicular designs really...go for gold.

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For those of you who have never experienced it, here's a quick example of what your experience in a Chinese hair salon will be like:

"Who do you want to do your hair for you today? Our store manager, John, our styling director, David, or the senior stylist, Daniel? You can wait 45 minutes for Daniel but our store manager is available now."

If you're confused, it's understandable. It's just as much a must for a Chinese barber to use an English name as it is for them to use an intricate pricing system that seems to be known only to the salon staffers.

So it'll definitely be a wait before you get sheared, but it'll be worth it.

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...Probably. It will probably be worth it.

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Beimeng Fu is a BuzzFeed News World Reporter covering China and is based in New York.

Contact Beimeng Fu at beimeng.fu@buzzfeed.com.

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