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16 Indonesian Sweet Treats You Need In Your Life

To all homesick Indonesians out there, I'M SORRY.

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1. Martabak Manis

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Let's start with the king of all Indonesian street snacks, martabak manis.

This sweet treat, which has nothing in common with the Middle-Eastern murtabak,

is mostly found across Java, sold by street vendors and high end cafes alike. Trapped between two slabs of buttery fluffiness, fillings range from traditional ones such as cheese, crushed peanuts, or chocolate, to contemporary iterations such as matcha or Oreos.

Perfect for a late night nibble.

2. Pisang Goreng

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Nothing pairs better with afternoon tea than a fresh plate of pisang goreng. Adapted from Portuguese banana fritters, this deep-fried goodness, which is mostly made from latundan banana, can be found on almost every corner of Indonesia, with different regions boasting their own versions of the dish.

Devour it with a dollop of sambal and wash it down with a cup of tea.

3. Serabi

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This one is for the gluten-free pancake lovers!

Traditionally made from a mixture of rice flour, coconut milk, and coconut sugar, serabi is a Javanese treat that can be eaten straight from the stone pan or smothered in a warm broth of sweet coconut milk. The cities of Bandung and Solo are famous for their versions of serabi, but due to its ubiquity you can find it in just about any major Indonesian city.

4. Pisang Ijo

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A popular dessert unique to the South Sulawesi city of Makassar, pisang ijo derives its name from the chewy green dough enveloping its banana filling. Served in a generous bowl of ice cold pink syrup and condensed milk, this dish is not only delicious, but also Instaworthy.

Great for remedying the scorching Makassar heat.

5. Wajik

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A treat that proves that less is better!

Customarily found all across Indonesia, wajik is a diamond-cut glutinous rice dish cooked in a simple blend of palm sugar, coconut milk, and pandan leaves. It is perfect for a teatime snack, hence its popularity at Indonesian get-togethers, and sinfully addictive.

Proceed to gorge with caution.

6. Kue Cubit

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Kue cubit , or pinched cake in English, is a favorite among Indonesian schoolchildren. Sold outside of schools or at traditional markets, the treat is adapted from the Dutch poffertjes, though it is lighter in taste.

Buy it by the dozen and proceed to nibble while you wait out the notorious Indonesian traffic.

7. Kue Mangkok

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If you think cupcakes cannot possibly get any cuter, think again.

A staple of Indonesian get-togethers, kue mangkok is a type of steamed cupcake made up of a mixture of wheat, rice, and tapioca flour. Different colors signal different flavors, and its tiny portion means that you can pop more than one into your mouth without feeling too guilty.

8. Dadar Gulung

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Perhaps Indonesia's answer to France's crepe, dadar gulung is a thinly rolled pancake made from a mixture of flour, egg, coconut milk, and pandan leaf.

Served during breakfast or teatime, it is usually filled with sweetened coconut shavings.

A lighter option for those avoiding high-calorie treats.

9. Onde-Onde

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A version of the Chinese jin deui, onde-onde is a type of fried pastry made from glutinous rice flour and coated with sesame seeds. Unlike the Chinese version, which has lotus, black bean, or red bean fillings, onde-onde is filled with mung bean paste, resulting in a sweet, but delicate taste that pairs perfectly with the pastry's crispiness.

Order them fresh from the fryer for maximum crunch.

10. Lapis Legit

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Also called spekkoek, lapis legit is a Dutch-Indonesian cake developed during the Dutch occupation of Indonesia. It is one of the richer Indonesian treats, consisting of a liberal amount of egg yolks, butter, and sugar, and is often enjoyed during special celebrations such as Chinese New Year, Eid ul-Fitr, and Christmas.

Can be pricey, but the sweet, buttery deliciousness is worth every rupiah.

11. Es Cendol

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Don't be fooled by the strange-looking jelly noodles! Es cendol is a national favorite, served anywhere from the streets to high end restaurants.

Made from a concoction of shaved ice, coconut milk, palm sugar syrup, and jelly noodles, es cendol is best enjoyed after a chow of Indonesian noodles. Other toppings include mango, red bean, and coconut, so feel free to customize it to your preference.

12. Es Podeng

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Shaved ice, tapioca pearls, avocado, black bean, condensed milk, and peanuts are heaped together in a fiesta of taste. Usually sold by streetside vendors, es podeng can also be found in a typical Indonesian shopping mall, though it will be much pricier than its street sister.

Request for extra roasted peanuts to balance the sweetness.

13. Klepon

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A simple treat made up of boiled rice cakes infused with palm sugar and rolled in coconut shavings, klepon is a unique Javanese dessert that is popular not only in Indonesia, but also in its neighboring countries.

Bite into a ball of klepon and you will immediately taste the palm sugar explosion

in your mouth, so keep a napkin handy, just in case.

14. Nagasari

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As you can tell by now, Indonesians love banana.

Usually found in traditional markets, nagasari is a steamed cake treat made up of rice flour, coconut milk, and sugar, filled with slices of banana. It comes wrapped in banana leaf, making it an easy on-the-go snack.

Banana lovers simply must try!

15. Kolak

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A popular Indonesian dessert, especially during Ramadan, kolak consists of pieces of tart fruits served in a bowl of coconut milk, sweetened with palm sugar and flavored with pandan leaf. Banana, jackfruit, sweet potato, and pumpkin are some of the common toppings used in kolak, with the banana variant, kolak pisang, being the most popular.

Especially delicious when eaten after a big dinner.

16. Gemblong

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To put it simply, gemblong is a deep-fried glutinous rice ball coated with palm sugar. It is extremely sweet and often found in the highland regions of Java, sold cheaply by traveling vendors by the bulk.

Best enjoyed warm, with a cup of coffee, while looking out to the paddy fields.

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