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Updated on Nov 20, 2018. Posted on Nov 11, 2016

You're Probably Not Using Condoms Right Unless You Can Pass This Quiz

Let's unwrap your condom IQ.

  1. 1. When used ~perfectly~, how effective are condoms at preventing pregnancy?

    joloei / gettyimages.com
    Correct! 
    Wrong! 

    With perfect use, condoms are 98% effective at preventing pregnancy!

    In this case, "perfect use" means using condoms correctly and consistently — so every single time, from start to finish. You can learn more about using condoms correctly here.

    Via youtube.com
  2. 2. Which of the following statements is true?

    LemonTreeImages / gettyimages.com
    Correct! 
    Wrong! 

    Using condoms can reduce your risk of genital HPV and HPV-associated disease.

    Using latex condoms consistently and correctly reduces the risk of STIs and HIV, but that's still not absolute protection. Condoms are also more likely to provide greater protection against STIs transmitted through genital fluids (like chlamydia, gonorrhea, and HIV) than against ones that can be transmitted through skin-to-contact (like herpes, HPV, and syphilis). That said, condoms can still reduce the risk of genital HPV and HPV-associated diseases.

  3. 3. With typical use, how effective are condoms at preventing pregnancy?

    KatarzynaBialasiewicz / gettyimages.com
    Correct! 
    Wrong! 

    Condoms are 82% effective at preventing pregnancy with typical use.

    Since most people don't use condoms completely perfectly every single time, this effectiveness measure reflects that.

    Via Universal Pictures / giphy.com
  4. 4. Which material isn't used to make condoms?

    Yasuyoshi Chiba / gettyimages.com
    Correct! 
    Wrong! 

    Polymide is not used to make condoms!

    While the latex condom is the most widely used (and cheapest) option, "lambskin" and polyurethane condoms also exist for people who are allergic to latex.

    Via youtube.com
  5. 5. Which material that's used to make condoms hasn't been proven to prevent sexually transmitted infections?

    jarun011 / gettyimages.com
    Correct! 
    Wrong! 

    "Lambskin" condoms will not prevent the transmission of STIs!

    Incorrectly called "lambskin condoms," these condoms are actually made of lamb intestines. They have tiny pores in them that, while capable of blocking sperm, can't block viruses like HIV or Hepatitis B.

    Via CTV / giphy.com
  6. 6. True or False: If you put a condom on upside down, you should just turn it around and unroll it the right way.

    pederk / gettyimages.com
    Correct! 
    Wrong! 

    False!

    As BuzzFeed Health previously reported, there's a chance you'll get pre-ejaculate on the outside of your condom when you put it on the wrong way. So if this happens, throw it out and start fresh with a new one!

    Via Planned Parenthood / youtube.com
  7. 7. What is the correct way to put a condom on?

    Mukhina1 / gettyimages.com
    Correct! 
    Wrong! 

    There are several steps to correctly putting a condom on!

    To prevent holes, you'll first want to open the wrapper carefully by tearing the corner with your hands. Then, place the condom on your erect penis and gently pinch the tip so that there's room for your ejaculate (this prevents it from leaking out of the sides). Finally, roll it down all the way to the base of the penis so that it fits snugly — not too tight and not too loose, so that it won't slip or break while having sex.

    Via Planned Parenthood / youtube.com
  8. 8. When should you put a condom on?

    diego_cervo / gettyimages.com
    Correct! 
    Wrong! 

    You should put it on before any kind of penetration, but with your penis already erect.

    An ill-fitting condom increases your risk of something going wrong. By putting it on when the penis is fully erect, you're not only reducing your risk of pregnancy and STIs, but also ensuring that the condom fits ~just right~ for as long as you're having sex.

    Via youtube.com
  9. 9. True or False: You should use a condom for oral sex, too.

    axelbueckert / gettyimages.com
    Correct! 
    Wrong! 

    True!

    While a lot of people don't use condoms or dental dams, they're really the best way to protect yourself from STIs that can be transmitted during oral sex.

    Via NBC / reactiongifs.com
  10. 10. Which of these shouldn't you use to lubricate a latex condom?

    Yasuyoshi Chiba / gettyimages.com
    Correct! 
    Wrong! 

    All of these are bad!

    Oil-based lubes can break down latex, which increases your risk of breakage and subsequent STI transmission or pregnancy. So stick to silicone- or water-based lubes instead — you'll thank yourself later.

    Via gifnews / giphy.com
  11. 11. True or False: You should remove the condom immediately after ejaculating.

    djedzura / gettyimages.com
    Correct! 
    Wrong! 

    It's true!

    Most men's penises soften up pretty quickly after ejaculating, and this makes it easy for semen to spill out of the condom. You can prevent this by holding the condom by the rim as you pull it off, then throwing it in the trash — right away.

    Via safeinthecity.org / youtube.com
  12. 12. How many times can you use the same condom in one night?

    IPGGutenbergUKLtd / gettyimages.com
    Correct! 
    Wrong! 

    You should only use a condom once!

    Even if you don't ejaculate, it's important to use a new condom every time you get hard. That's because the condom stretches a little to fit around your ~unique~ size each time. Pulling an old one back on can stress the material, increasing the risk that it'll break.

    Via NBA / giphy.com
  13. 13. Can you use the same condom for oral and vaginal sex?

    keko64 / gettyimages.com
    Correct! 
    Wrong! 

    You should never use the same condom for oral and vaginal sex!

    You should be using a new condom every time you switch up into a new sex act. This way there's a new condom being used with each ~hole~, reducing your risk of STIs and other infections.

    Via FOX / gifbay.com
  14. 14. Using two condoms at the same time ________.

    Dimas Ardian / gettyimages.com
    Correct! 
    Wrong! 

    Using two condoms is less effective than using one!

    "Double-bagging" your penis could increase the risk of breakage, because of the friction it creates. For this reason, you also shouldn't use a male and female condom at the same time.

    Via youtube.com
  15. 15. What about female condoms? How effective are those at preventing pregnancy, with perfect and typical use?

    Tao Chuan Yeh / gettyimages.com
    Correct! 
    Wrong! 

    When used perfectly, female condoms are 95% effective at preventing pregnancy. That effectiveness goes down to 79% with typical use.

    Here's more information on female condoms, plus a video that explains how to use one.

    Via umbrellahealth.co.uk
  16. 16. True or False: Having a condom in your wallet, ready to go, is always a good idea.

    Denis Kilmov / gettyimages.com
    Correct! 
    Wrong! 

    It's not a good idea!

    OK, so kind of a trick question. But you should store condoms in a cool, dry place — and your wallet is not that, with all the body heat it's exposed to. The heat could dry out your condom and make it prone to breakage.

    Via youtube.com
  17. 17. True or False: Condoms can expire.

    kunertus / gettyimages.com
    Correct! 
    Wrong! 

    Condoms can expire!

    So look on your condom's package for the date before you wrap it up!

    Via NBC / popsugar.com
  18. 18. Condoms are considered a ______ method of birth control.

    cocoalex / gettyimages.com
    Correct! 
    Wrong! 

    Condoms are considered a barrier method of birth control!

    Unlike hormonal birth control options, condoms provide a physical barrier that helps to prevent semen from entering the vagina. Experts call this a "barrier method" of birth control.

    Via TV Land / giphy.com

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