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Our 9 Favorite Feature Stories This Week: Dirty Cops, Michael Brown Sr., And A Whole Lot Of Elvis

This week for BuzzFeed News, Elise Jordan goes back to her hometown Mississippi to visit the world's most notorious Elvis shrine. Read that and these other great stories from BuzzFeed and around the web.

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1. The Last Days Of Graceland Too — BuzzFeed News

Photograph by Tim Soter

Paul MacLeod's Graceland Too — a house-turned-shrine to the King of Rock 'n Roll — ushered in decades of tourism to the small town of Holly Springs, MS and made its eccentric owner a local celebrity. But when MacLeod shot his handyman dead at the property and died himself two days later, Graceland Too came to symbolize more than an innocuous hobby. Read it at BuzzFeed News.

2. America's Dirtiest Cops: Cash, Cocaine and Corruption on the Texas BorderRolling Stone

Illustration by John Ritter, Image of Alexis Espinoza in illustration by Gabe Hernandez/“The Monitor” / AP Images

An unbelievable romp of a story by Josh Eells on the rise and downfall of the Panama Unit, an elite anti-narcotics border task force — led by the son of a sheriff — that took bribes from some drug dealers and used police resources to rob others. "They were running around like that movie Training Day." Read it at Rolling Stone.

3. Michael Brown Sr. and the Agony of the Black Father in AmericaEsquire

Photograph by Barrett Emke for Esquire

John H. Richardson spends a heartbreaking, yet hopeful, Thanksgiving with the Brown family, as Mike Brown, Sr. reflects on his son, goes to church, and grapples with his new life in the public eye. "At one point, he lowers his head and hides his face under his hat brim. When he lifts his head again, his face looks exhausted and stoic and agonized, like a man determined not to cry out under torture." Read it at Esquire.

4. Construction Work is Getting More Deadly, but Only for Latinos — BuzzFeed News

Staten Island Advance / SILive / Via silive.com

While construction work has gotten safer for every other group over the past decade, the deaths of Latino workers has been on the rise. David Noriega reports on the startling trend. Read it at BuzzFeed News.

5. The Town Without Wi-FiWashingtonian

Photograph by Joshua Cogan for Washingtonian

Green Bank, West Virginia is a town where residents are banned from using technology most of us can't imagine living without: wi-fi, cell phones, Bluetooth. It's become a haven for people who believe their medical problems stem from electromagnetism but, as Michael J. Gaynor explores, not all the locals are happy about it. Read it at Washingtonian.

6. Chris Harrison: The Reigning King of #BachelorNationGQ

PHotograph by Art Streiber for GQ

Taffy Brodesser-Akner hangs out with Chris Harrison, the charming host of The Bachelor, as he navigates having recently become a bachelor himself. "It is hard to believe that a man whose job is to be a human seismometer of romantic chemistry can be so oblivious, but maybe it's the sort of thing where the cobbler's children have no shoes, or doctors can't operate on themselves." Read it at GQ.

7. The Rise of the Black British Actor in America — BuzzFeed News

Atsushi Nishijima/Paramount Pictures

Lacking opportunities in the UK, many black British actors, such as Selma's David Oleyowo, have recently found success in the states, writes Kelley Carter. "There’s a black British Actor Renaissance of sorts occurring, largely because black Brits aren’t finding the type of work in the United Kingdom that allows them to explore the depth they’re seeking from their roles." Read it at BuzzFeed News.

8. Food Fight: Dallas Chefs Take on the Morning NewsD Magazine

Photograph by Kevin Marple for D Magazine

Zac Crain dives into the embittered battle that has been publicly stewing for the past year between a top Dallas food critic and the city's best chefs. “It was like watching Frankenstein and seeing the townspeople head up to the professor’s operating room with pitchforks and torches." Read it at D Magazine.

9. The Talking CureThe New Yorker

Illustration by Leo Espinosa for the New Yorker

Margaret Talbot visits Providence, Rhode Island, where the mayor has secured millions for an innovative program aimed at closing the "word gap," the disparity in words learned by poorer children compared to their wealthier counterparts. The program is just one complex example of national efforts to tackle educational reform. Read it at The New Yorker.

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