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Mike Huckabee's History DVD Teaches Kids The Opposite Of What He Believes About The Supreme Court

Huckabee's history DVDs for kids, as he would say now, bow before the "false god of judicial supremacy," declaring the Supreme Court the ultimate legal authority in the land.

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GOP presidential candidate Mike Huckabee has said he wouldn't follow the Supreme Court's June ruling legalizing same-sex marriages, but back when he was selling educational DVDs, Huckabee was teaching kids that the Court was the "ultimate authority" on the Constitution.

Before running for president, Mike Huckabee often promoted "FREE" DVD programs on his popular Fox News show and on his Facebook page that have recurring charges hidden away in the fine print. The programs are made by the company Learn Our History, which Huckabee co-founded. The company is part of EverBright Media.


Regarding the Supreme Court's ruling that same-sex marriage bans are unconstitutional, Huckabee has said he would ignore the court as president. Huckabee says the courts can not overturn "the ultimate authority" of "the people themselves."

"I would say the Supreme Court has issued a ruling, we will review it, we will respect it, but we will not follow it, because it goes against the will of voters in over 30 states," said Huckabee to an Iowa radio host last month.

"The Supreme Court overstepped their bounds and until the Congress of the United States, consisting of elected representatives from the people, present a bill to enable such a thing and until the president signs it and agrees to enforce it, it is not the law of the land. It remains an opinion of the court, nothing but an opinion of the court."

"The courts simply cannot overturn the ultimate authority in the United States under our Constitution: the people themselves," he added.

Here's that audio:

Here's the DVDs case on the role of the Supreme Court (emphasis added):

The nine justices of the Supreme Court are the ultimate authority on the Constitutionality of law and have been critical to the maintenance of the rule of law and a consistent system of government since the earliest days of the nation. While often controversial, the Supreme Court takes on the country's most challenging and complex cases and matters of law and makes a final determination that the nation recognizes as definitive.

Huckabee has slammed politicians who "have surrendered to the false god of judicial supremacy."

"Many of our politicians have surrendered to the false god of judicial supremacy, which would allow black-robed and unelected judges the power to make law as well as enforce it," Huckabee said in May.

Huckabee likewise wrote in USA Today after the ruling on same-sex marriage, "as president, I will never bow down to the false gods of judicial supremacy."

Can the Supreme Court "decide" this? They cannot. Under our Constitution, we have three, co-equal branches of government. The courts can interpret law but cannot create it. The ruling still requires congressional funding and executive branch enforcement. The Supreme Court is not the "Supreme Branch," and it is certainly not the Supreme Being. If they can unilaterally make law, and just do whatever they want, then we have judicial tyranny.

Throughout our nation's history, the court has abused its power and delivered morally unconscionable rulings. They have rationalized the destruction of innocent human life, defined African Americans as property and justified Japanese-American internment camps. U.S. presidents, including Abraham Lincoln, Andrew Jackson, and Franklin Delano Roosevelt, ignored Supreme Court rulings, rejecting the notion that the Supreme Court can circumvent the Constitution and "make law."

I also reject the idea of "judicial supremacy" as just another flawed, failed feature of big government, inconsistent with what our founders fought a revolution to establish.

The episode of the show follows a group of students who travel back in time to research past Supreme Court cases. Marbury v. Madison, Dred Scott, Schechter Poultry Corp. v. United States and in it they learn the history of the court.

The kids are preparing for a case in which a bill they got based through the legislature related to education was being challenged by an education lobbyist. The state supreme court upholds the law.

Andrew Kaczynski is a political reporter for BuzzFeed News and is based in New York.

Contact Andrew Kaczynski at

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