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Can You Tell Which Historical Quotes Cited By Rand Paul Are Misattributed?

BuzzFeed News has found more instances of Rand Paul misattributing quotations to historical figures in American history. Can you spot them?

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BuzzFeed News has found several instances in books and speeches when Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul has misattributed a quotation to a founding father or other historical figures in American history.

A further review by BuzzFeed News has turned up several previously unnoticed instances in which the Republican presidential candidate has misattributed a quotation. Can you spot the real from the fake?

Take the quiz:

  1. Did Thomas Jefferson say this?

    Rand Paul's Facebook
    Yes
    No
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Jefferson never said that.

    "This quotation has not been found in any of the writings of Thomas Jefferson," the Thomas Jefferson Foundation says.

  2. Did Ralph Waldo Emerson ever say this?

    Yes
    No
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Nope.

    This quote is not in his "published writing or published journal," said Joel Myerson, a prominent scholar on Emerson and professor emeritus at the University of South Carolina.

  3. Did Thomas Jefferson write this of debt, as Rand Paul wrote in his book, The Tea Party Goes to Washington?

    Yes
    No
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    He did!

    Jefferson wrote these words in a letter to Samuel Kerchival.

  4. Did Lincoln say this, as Paul has said in speeches and one of his books?

    Yes
    No
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Lincoln didn't say this.

    Multiple Lincoln scholars have dismissed this as totally false.

  5. Did George Washington say this in his farewell address, as Rand Paul writes?

    Yes
    No
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Yes, this is a real Washington quote.

    Washington uttered these words in his famous farewell address.

  6. Did Lincoln say these words, as Rand Paul said in a 2011 speech?

    Yes
    No
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    No way did Lincoln say this.

    Prominent Lincoln scholar Harold Holzer, author of 51 books on Lincoln says in no uncertain terms this quote is fake. "This is yet another apocryphal Lincoln quote. I hate to say it, but Senator Paul must own a lexicon of spurious, fraudulent, and un-attributable Lincoln quotations. Really, it's easy to find such sentiments among Lincoln's genuine words — albeit, in this case, from his raw, first major speech, decades before his national fame — but Lincoln never said it this way, and it shouldn't be so repeated. Senator Paul is about to surpass Ronald Reagan in recirculating fake Lincolnisms, and that's no minor accomplishment, considering the fact that ex-President Reagan fooled millions of people at the 1988 Republican National Convention by repeating fake Lincoln quotes he had found in a toastmaster's quotation book! Enough already."

  7. Did Patrick Henry say this?

    Yes
    No
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Nope, he didn't say that.

    Patrick Henry scholar Thomas Kidd of Baylor University has written, " this quotation seems to have been entirely fabricated, and quite recently at that."

  8. Did James Madison say this, as Paul has said?

    Yes
    No
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Yes, Madison did indeed say this.

    In 1788, Madison wrote, "If men were angels, no government would be necessary. If angels were to govern men, neither external nor internal controls on government would be necessary."

  9. Did Jefferson write this, as Paul cites in his book Government Bullies?

    Yes
    No
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Yes, it's real!

    Jefferson wrote this in an 1816 letter.

  10. Did James Madison say this, as Paul wrote in Government Bullies?

    Yes
    No
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    He did!

    Yes, Madison wrote this in 1792!

Can You Tell Which Historical Quotes Cited By Rand Paul Are Misattributed?

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Andrew Kaczynski is a political reporter for BuzzFeed News and is based in New York.

Contact Andrew Kaczynski at andrew.kaczynski@buzzfeed.com.

Megan Apper is a political reporter for BuzzFeed News and is based in New York.

Contact Megan Apper at megan.apper@buzzfeed.com.

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