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What Nanomolecule Are You?

In honor of National Nanotechnology Day on October 9, find out which nanomolecule you are!

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What Nanomolecule Are You?

You got: Buckyball

You crave balance in your life and try to keep a low profile, but you can thrive in the spotlight when needed. Buckyballs, also known as fullerenes, are made of 60 carbon atoms arranged in a highly symmetric soccer ball shape. Unlike better-known forms of carbon—diamonds and graphite—nobody even knew buckyballs existed until scientists discovered them in the 1980s. Today, researchers are hard at work looking for ways to use buckyball’s special shape and properties for medicine and other applications. Click here to learn more about the discovery of fullernes and their impact on nanotechnology and visit www.acs.org/nano to learn more about how tiny science is making a big difference.

Buckyball
Robert Hodgin (Flickr: flight404)
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You got: DNA Origami

Creative and clever, you can take even the most common things and make them into something new! Similar to its macroscale namesake, DNA origami refers to the folding of DNA chains into shapes and patterns just a few nanometers in size. Not just for show, researchers are pushing the limits of this molecular folding, looking for ways to use DNA origami in electronics and medicine. Check out www.acs.org/nano to learn more about how tiny science is making a big difference.

DNA Origami
Paul W. K. Rothemund
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You got: Titanium Carbide Turtle

Ok, so you’re not a real turtle, but you like to have fun and find humor in any situation. This happy little guy is actually a titanium carbide (Ti3C2) MXene particle. MXenes are strong, flexible materials made up of two-dimensional transition-metal carbides and nitrides. MXenes were first described in 2011 and have applications in water purification membranes, lithium-ion batteries, and more. Check out www.acs.org/nano to learn more about how tiny science is making a big difference.

Titanium Carbide Turtle
Babak Anasori, Michael Naguib, Yury Gogotsi, and Michel W. Barsoum
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You got: World's Tiniest Race Car

Always on-the-go and pushing the limits, you constantly look for new challenges, no matter the size! Researchers from six countries recently competed in the first ever nanocar race, a contest pitting molecular machine versus molecular machine. More than mere fun, nanocars are helping scientists test new microscope technologies and learn just what nanostructures can do. Check out www.acs.org/nano to learn more about how tiny science is making a big difference.

World's Tiniest Race Car
TU Dresden/Mana-NIMS/Ohio University/University of Basel/Rice University/G. Rapenne/ P. Abeilhou/CEMES-CNRS CNRS/C&EN
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You got: Quantum Dot

Just like these nanocrystals, you really shine! Quantum dots are really tiny semiconductors that emit a single wavelength when stimulated by electricity or light—bright and versatile, just like you. Researchers think quantum dots can be used for solar cells, lasers, and medical imaging, and they already show up in some super high-definition televisions. Want to learn more? Check out this video about some of the brilliant applications of quantum dots and visit www.acs.org/nano to learn more about how tiny science is making a big difference.

Quantum Dot
Sigma-Aldrich
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