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10 Seriously Useful Money Tips That Everyone Can Use

There are lots of ways to make a small amount of extra money without disrupting your day to day life.

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1. Calculate what your bills will look like each month, and save for them in advance.

"I calculate what my bills are going to be for the month (car payment, rent, utility bills) then put half of that from each paycheck (I get paid bi-weekly) into savings so I know how much extra I have to work with. I also usually try to round up my bills and then I won't touch that extra money I put into my savings. For example, if my rent is $375 a month, I'll take out $200 a paycheck and keep the extra $25 I didn't use on rent as extra savings." —elyse1509 For more tips like this, check out: 31 People Share The Best Money Advice They've Ever Gotten
Hannah Hillam/ BuzzFeed

"I calculate what my bills are going to be for the month (car payment, rent, utility bills) then put half of that from each paycheck (I get paid bi-weekly) into savings so I know how much extra I have to work with. I also usually try to round up my bills and then I won't touch that extra money I put into my savings. For example, if my rent is $375 a month, I'll take out $200 a paycheck and keep the extra $25 I didn't use on rent as extra savings." —elyse1509

For more tips like this, check out: 31 People Share The Best Money Advice They've Ever Gotten

2. Become aware of emotional spending.

In her book Unf*ck Your Finances, Melissa Browne writes about resetting your emotions around money: "'Thoughts like 'it's been a tough month, I deserve something pretty'; or 'I work hard, I deserve a £50,000 car'; or 'My child won't succeed without us spending £20,000 per year on schooling' aren't helpful for you, your family, or your wallet. It's also important to understand how you think about money. Perhaps you've been brought up to believe 'a man always takes care of a woman financially', 'people with too much money are selfish', or 'money is the root of all evil'. If you don't understand how you think about money you could be unconsciously sabotaging your relationship with it."
Maritsa Patrinos/ BuzzFeed

In her book Unf*ck Your Finances, Melissa Browne writes about resetting your emotions around money:

"'Thoughts like 'it's been a tough month, I deserve something pretty'; or 'I work hard, I deserve a £50,000 car'; or 'My child won't succeed without us spending £20,000 per year on schooling' aren't helpful for you, your family, or your wallet. It's also important to understand how you think about money. Perhaps you've been brought up to believe 'a man always takes care of a woman financially', 'people with too much money are selfish', or 'money is the root of all evil'. If you don't understand how you think about money you could be unconsciously sabotaging your relationship with it."

3. Wait 24 hours before you buy something.

"My biggest weakness with money is impulse shopping. When I’m feeling sad or stressed, or even when I’m feeling a burst of motivation, emotion is a huge money-spending impulse for me. I try my best to create a list of things I’ve been wanting, or even while I’m browsing through Target, I’ll make a list, and I have to wait 24 hours before I can buy it. The likelihood of me wanting it after 24 hours is super slim."—megans49012f3c9
Twitter: @skinny_que

"My biggest weakness with money is impulse shopping. When I’m feeling sad or stressed, or even when I’m feeling a burst of motivation, emotion is a huge money-spending impulse for me. I try my best to create a list of things I’ve been wanting, or even while I’m browsing through Target, I’ll make a list, and I have to wait 24 hours before I can buy it. The likelihood of me wanting it after 24 hours is super slim."

megans49012f3c9

4. Talk to a financial planner.

"My fiancé and I finally went to see a financial planner after years of ending every month just praying there were still a couple of dollars left in our bank accounts. It was LIFE CHANGING. By the time we got to her office for the appointment, she had multiple Excel docs that told us EXACTLY how much we could actually afford to spend in a month, how much we could realistically save, and how much we should be spending on our student debt.Less than a year after meeting with her, we had over $10,000 in our joint checking account thanks to her simple plan. For us, that’s big! It’s not so much about budgeting line by line. Rather, she clarified for us how much we could actually spend on discretionary items per month."—kathrync494392eb3 For more tips like this, check out: 23 Ways To Be A Little Bit Smarter About Your Money
Nathan Pyle/ BuzzFeed

"My fiancé and I finally went to see a financial planner after years of ending every month just praying there were still a couple of dollars left in our bank accounts. It was LIFE CHANGING. By the time we got to her office for the appointment, she had multiple Excel docs that told us EXACTLY how much we could actually afford to spend in a month, how much we could realistically save, and how much we should be spending on our student debt.

Less than a year after meeting with her, we had over $10,000 in our joint checking account thanks to her simple plan. For us, that’s big! It’s not so much about budgeting line by line. Rather, she clarified for us how much we could actually spend on discretionary items per month."

kathrync494392eb3

For more tips like this, check out: 23 Ways To Be A Little Bit Smarter About Your Money

5. If you can't afford a financial planner, then refresh your browser bookmarks.

Here are some sites that might help get you started:The Financial Diet: A relatable and smart site that covers all financial questions and scenarios – from saving money to asking for a raise at work. The Bad With Money podcast: The official description sells it better than I could. "Every week, Gaby brings a queer, feminist, unabashedly radical point of view to conversations with celebrities, journalists, politicians, authors, activists, and fellow deadbeats. If you're sick of podcast 'experts' giving you practical financial advice, you're going to love Bad With Money".Money Saving Expert: The number-one source for savings advice online.
Michael Hinson/ BuzzFeed

Here are some sites that might help get you started:

The Financial Diet: A relatable and smart site that covers all financial questions and scenarios – from saving money to asking for a raise at work.

The Bad With Money podcast: The official description sells it better than I could. "Every week, Gaby brings a queer, feminist, unabashedly radical point of view to conversations with celebrities, journalists, politicians, authors, activists, and fellow deadbeats. If you're sick of podcast 'experts' giving you practical financial advice, you're going to love Bad With Money".

Money Saving Expert: The number-one source for savings advice online.

6. Try a saving challenge.

"The 365 day penny challenge. For the skint of us that can’t afford to do the 52 week challenge where you put aside an extra pound each week (e.g- week 1-£1, week 2-£2… week 52, £52) follow this instead, it saved me £667.95 in 2016 alone!All that you do is put aside an extra penny a day, yes, only a penny extra. E.g- day 1- £0.01,day 2-£0.02 (total profit=£0.03),day 3-£0.03 (total profit=£0.06)Search the challenge up! It’s the only saving challenge that I’ve ever fully stuck to." – rabbithugs For more tips like this, check out: 19 Insanely Useful Money Saving Tips For 20 Somethings
Dean Nye/ BuzzFeed

"The 365 day penny challenge. For the skint of us that can’t afford to do the 52 week challenge where you put aside an extra pound each week (e.g- week 1-£1, week 2-£2… week 52, £52) follow this instead, it saved me £667.95 in 2016 alone!

All that you do is put aside an extra penny a day, yes, only a penny extra. E.g- day 1- £0.01,

day 2-£0.02 (total profit=£0.03),

day 3-£0.03 (total profit=£0.06)

Search the challenge up! It’s the only saving challenge that I’ve ever fully stuck to." – rabbithugs

For more tips like this, check out: 19 Insanely Useful Money Saving Tips For 20 Somethings

7. Or try a formal savings plan.

"I hit a financial low earlier this year. My husband lost his job, bills started piling up, and it was a struggle to meet our mortgage repayments. People talk about living paycheck to paycheck but we weren't even able to do that. I was telling people 'I'll pay you back next Friday,' only to be paid on Friday, then be broke again by Monday. I felt defeated."It was around this time I remembered that a friend had once recommended Dave Ramsey's financial plan. I signed up for a nine-week course and learned a lot, including the idea that every month needs a different budget. Now, at the start of each month, my husband and I set time aside to talk about upcoming expenses. Some months have birthdays and weddings, so this is the time we note those and plan ahead. We then set a dollar amount for each category in our lives (groceries, gas, entertainment, home improvement etc.) and do not go over that budget — it's a contract we both adhere to." —Julie Mundt, via email For more tips like this, try: 12 Women Share The Practical Money Advice They Wish They Knew Sooner
Jemima Skelley / BuzzFeed

"I hit a financial low earlier this year. My husband lost his job, bills started piling up, and it was a struggle to meet our mortgage repayments. People talk about living paycheck to paycheck but we weren't even able to do that. I was telling people 'I'll pay you back next Friday,' only to be paid on Friday, then be broke again by Monday. I felt defeated.

"It was around this time I remembered that a friend had once recommended Dave Ramsey's financial plan. I signed up for a nine-week course and learned a lot, including the idea that every month needs a different budget. Now, at the start of each month, my husband and I set time aside to talk about upcoming expenses. Some months have birthdays and weddings, so this is the time we note those and plan ahead. We then set a dollar amount for each category in our lives (groceries, gas, entertainment, home improvement etc.) and do not go over that budget — it's a contract we both adhere to." —Julie Mundt, via email

For more tips like this, try: 12 Women Share The Practical Money Advice They Wish They Knew Sooner

8. Try the Friday estimate.

"I got this idea from The Billfold's Friday Estimate. Each week, Nicole Dieker estimates how much money she's going to spend during the upcoming weekend and encourages readers to do the same. I love this idea because personally, one of the worst feelings is getting to Sunday night and realizing that I've unexpectedly blown my budget for the month.Doing a Friday Estimate eliminates the surprise of expensive weekends and instead prepares you for what's to come — or simply shows that you've made more plans than you can afford. I've started writing my estimates in my bullet journal and already know this will be a habit I continue, especially as we move towards summer, aka a time when I don't just want to stay indoors eating pasta and reading, like I do now." – Gyan Yankovich For more tips like this, try: I Tried 6 Money-Saving Hacks And Here's What Actually Worked
Michael Hinson/ BuzzFeed

"I got this idea from The Billfold's Friday Estimate. Each week, Nicole Dieker estimates how much money she's going to spend during the upcoming weekend and encourages readers to do the same. I love this idea because personally, one of the worst feelings is getting to Sunday night and realizing that I've unexpectedly blown my budget for the month.

Doing a Friday Estimate eliminates the surprise of expensive weekends and instead prepares you for what's to come — or simply shows that you've made more plans than you can afford. I've started writing my estimates in my bullet journal and already know this will be a habit I continue, especially as we move towards summer, aka a time when I don't just want to stay indoors eating pasta and reading, like I do now." – Gyan Yankovich

For more tips like this, try: I Tried 6 Money-Saving Hacks And Here's What Actually Worked

9. Make some money from the things you already do!

From renting out a spare room on AirBnB, or signing up with a cashback site there are lots of ways to make a small amount of extra money without disrupting your day to day life. Just be aware that any income you make in addition to your wages needs to be declared to HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC). This article is a good place to find ideas: 26 Totally Legit Ways To Make Money In Your Spare Time
Maritsa Patrinos/ BuzzFeed

From renting out a spare room on AirBnB, or signing up with a cashback site there are lots of ways to make a small amount of extra money without disrupting your day to day life. Just be aware that any income you make in addition to your wages needs to be declared to HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC).

This article is a good place to find ideas: 26 Totally Legit Ways To Make Money In Your Spare Time

10. Think seriously about your pension, but don't panic.

"There's a rule of thumb for pensions – you should always put in the proportion of your salary equal to half your age when you started. So, if you started at 20, you should put in 10% of your salary throughout your career. If you start at 30, however, you'll need to pay 15% of your salary for the rest of your career, and so on."Realistically, very few people can pay in that much – or that consistently. In your twenties, if you do have spare cash to start a pension, you should. Pensions tend to be invested in the stock market, and the longer they're in there, the more chance your investment has to grow – remember, it could be 40 or even 50 years until you retire if you're in your early twenties."But, if you have expensive debts, or all your cash is taken up by living costs, then it's not the worst thing that you can't start a pension. But, keep it in the back of your mind – next time you get a promotion, see if you can't put some of that extra cash into saving for retirement." – Helen Saxon, chief product analyst at MoneySavingExpert.com For more tips like this, check out: 13 Things You Need To Know About Money In Your Twenties
Natalya Lobanova/ BuzzFeed

"There's a rule of thumb for pensions – you should always put in the proportion of your salary equal to half your age when you started. So, if you started at 20, you should put in 10% of your salary throughout your career. If you start at 30, however, you'll need to pay 15% of your salary for the rest of your career, and so on.

"Realistically, very few people can pay in that much – or that consistently. In your twenties, if you do have spare cash to start a pension, you should. Pensions tend to be invested in the stock market, and the longer they're in there, the more chance your investment has to grow – remember, it could be 40 or even 50 years until you retire if you're in your early twenties.

"But, if you have expensive debts, or all your cash is taken up by living costs, then it's not the worst thing that you can't start a pension. But, keep it in the back of your mind – next time you get a promotion, see if you can't put some of that extra cash into saving for retirement." – Helen Saxon, chief product analyst at MoneySavingExpert.com

For more tips like this, check out: 13 Things You Need To Know About Money In Your Twenties