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If You Think You're A Real Hipster, Wait 'Til You See The 1790s Version

They literally risked death to be ironic.

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As the aristocracy faced the guillotine, their fashions went out of favor. The clothes worn by the French king Louis XVI, his wife Marie Antoinette, and the aristocracy were considered outmoded, and no longer viewed as something to aspire to.

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But despite this divide, a group of young aristocrats who had grown up amongst the instability of the Revolution were rebelling in their own way: with outrageous, flamboyant fashion.

And they were all about irony. They mocked the excessive style of the pre-revolution upper class. They mocked the time, and even themselves. They wanted to be seen as a spectacle.

The Merveilleuses were the women of this movement. They wore very sheer dresses, often with nothing underneath, and poured water over the fabric so the material clung to their bare curves.

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They were real-life caricatures of the pre-revolutionary aristocrats and their extravagant fashions and lifestyles.

They attended balls called the bal de pendus or le bal des victimes, both a time to blow off steam and, in a way, mourn– because to be allowed into these events, you had to have a relative who'd been executed. They'd wear red around their necks, mimicking those who had died by guillotine.

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  1. But what do you think? Were the Incroyables and Merveilleuses the original hipsters? Or were they just a boring blip on fashion history?

    Louis-Léopold Boilly / Public Domain
    Correct
    Incorrect
    They were DEFINITELY hipsters!
    Correct
    Incorrect
    What are you talking about?! Stop trying to make this a thing.
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But what do you think? Were the Incroyables and Merveilleuses the original hipsters? Or were they just a boring blip on fashion history?
  1.  
    vote votes
    They were DEFINITELY hipsters!
  2.  
    vote votes
    What are you talking about?! Stop trying to make this a thing.

Credits: fashionencyclopedia.com, Fall of Public Man by Richard Sennett, world4u.eu, cracked.com, tiffanyslittleblog.blogspot.com, Stephanie Buck / Timeline.com, Listening in Paris: A Cultural History by James H. Johnson, https://www.paperblog.fr/users/mademoiselle_titam/

 
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