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14 Things I've Learned Since I Started Wearing A Hijab

I started wearing a hijab two years ago. Here are a few things I've learned.

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1. Everyone expects you to be some kind of Islamic scholar.

Warner Bros. / Via mudbloodnproud.tumblr.com

Unfortunately, putting on a hijab doesn't mean you automatically know everything there is to know about Islam. But as soon as I started wearing one, people started asking me incredibly specific questions.

2. Some normal places and situations suddenly become quite uncomfortable.

Pubs, bars, concerts, house parties, and office Christmas parties all felt a bit awkward when I first started wearing a hijab. Basically, where there's alcohol and dancing, especially if you're the only Muslim there, you'll feel a bit uncomfortable.

3. Most people will treat you exactly the same.

Friends and family who've known you for years won't even flinch when you put a hijab on. These people are your true friends.
Via knowledgeoverflow.com

Friends and family who've known you for years won't even flinch when you put a hijab on. These people are your true friends.

4. But there will be some people who treat you differently.

People who didn't know you well, and perhaps didn't realise you were a Muslim, may be a bit awkward around you. But that's OK; these people just need to time to adjust.
Via lifeundertheepicempire.wordpress.com

People who didn't know you well, and perhaps didn't realise you were a Muslim, may be a bit awkward around you. But that's OK; these people just need to time to adjust.

5. You become much more concerned with self-image, but in a different way.

Even though your hijab is supposed to hide your beauty, you'll ask yourself questions like: Is my hijab OK? Are the clothes that cover me still stylish? Do I look pretty?

6. You may have weak moments in which you consider taking it off.

This may not happen to every hijabi, but it can happen. The important thing to remember is that iI doesn't mean your faith is weakening. It's completely normal for girls to look at their hair in the mirror and wish they could go out looking their absolute best.

7. Suddenly, people expect you to have an opinion on every aspect of Middle Eastern and Islamic politics.

If anything relating to Islam gets reported on in the news, your non-Muslim friends will turn to you and expect you to deliver a passion-filled monologue on the topic. And while many Muslims have opinions on Middle Eastern politics, we don't all want to discuss them all the time.
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If anything relating to Islam gets reported on in the news, your non-Muslim friends will turn to you and expect you to deliver a passion-filled monologue on the topic. And while many Muslims have opinions on Middle Eastern politics, we don't all want to discuss them all the time.

8. You don't save any time getting ready even though you don't have to do your hair.

The time I used to spend washing and straightening my hair is now spent choosing a scarf, putting it on, tying it, and sticking in its pins. Basically, I save no time in the morning. In fact, I probably spend more time making sure my hijab is on straight and matches my outfit.

9. A hijab doesn't restrict you from doing what you want.

I thought my hijab would restrict me from doing practical things, but I soon realised that wasn't the case. If I wanted to go snorkelling, I could buy a burkini. If I wanted to go on a spa day with my friends, I could. Anything is possible.
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I thought my hijab would restrict me from doing practical things, but I soon realised that wasn't the case. If I wanted to go snorkelling, I could buy a burkini. If I wanted to go on a spa day with my friends, I could. Anything is possible.

10. Being a hijabi means people hold you up to higher standards.

If I'm seen talking to a man as a non-hijabi, it's not a big deal. But talking to a man as a hijabi means people are suddenly like, "Oh, she's the kind of hijabi who hangs out with men." And if I wear a lot of make-up, they're all, "She's wearing a bit too much make-up for a hijabi."

11. But hijabis judge other hijabis too.

As a hijabi, I tend to notice other hijabis around me. Which means I'm prone to judging other hijabis in terms of what they wear and how they do their hijab.

12. You can be a hijabi and have a love life.

Wearing a hijab doesn't mean that men stop being interested in you. Muslims, and non-Muslims, are interested, so your love life certainly won't become non-existent.
weheartit.com / Via weheartit.com

Wearing a hijab doesn't mean that men stop being interested in you. Muslims, and non-Muslims, are interested, so your love life certainly won't become non-existent.

13. Being a hijabi doesn't mean you're better than non-hijabis or any other Muslims.

When you put on a hijab, people may think you're on some kind of "higher religious level", but it's important to remember that people who don't wear hijabs can be just as religious as you. Islam isn't about appearance; it's a religion based on inner intentions.
Via happinessishomemade.net

When you put on a hijab, people may think you're on some kind of "higher religious level", but it's important to remember that people who don't wear hijabs can be just as religious as you. Islam isn't about appearance; it's a religion based on inner intentions.

14. But most importantly, you can still completely be yourself.

Whether you enjoy rapping to yourself in your favourite hoodie or dancing in your room wearing pyjamas, hijabis are the exact same as other girls. More than anything, I was happy to learn that I didn't have to change who I was. Rather, I realised that my hijab was a part of who I already was.