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How Well Do You Actually Remember Elementary School Grammar?

Oh god, should this sentence have more commas???

  1. 1. Select the preposition in this sentence.

    Correct! 
    Wrong! 

    Behind!

    Prepositions are words generally used in front of nouns and pronouns to show the relationship between those words and the rest of the words in a sentence. Source.

  2. 2. How many adverbs are in this sentence?

    Correct! 
    Wrong! 

    Three!

    Adverbs are words that give information about verbs, adjectives, and/or other adverbs. Source. Correction: This post originally stated that there were two adverbs when there are, in fact, three.

  3. 3. Correctly punctuate this sentence.

    Correct! 
    Wrong! 

    Nonessential clauses add extra information to a sentence and are set off with a comma. Source

  4. Correct! 
    Wrong! 

    Whose!

    "Who's" is a contraction that always means "who is" or "who has." "Whose," on the other hand, is used to indicate possession. Source.

  5. Correct! 
    Wrong! 

    Though both words can be used either as a verb or a noun, "affect" and "effect" do not overlap in meaning. Source.

  6. 6. Select the subject of this sentence.

    Correct! 
    Wrong! 

    Computer!

    The sentence's subject is a noun that is doing something in the sentence. Generally, if you just look to see what is "verb-ing" in a sentence, that word is the subject. Source.

  7. 7. Place quotation marks in this sentence.

    Correct! 
    Wrong! 

    Quotation marks are used to indicate direct quotes and are set off with a comma after "said." In American English, the period is placed inside the closing quotation mark. Source

  8. Correct! 
    Wrong! 

    An independent clause contains a subject and a verb and expresses a full thought on its own. Source.

  9. Also known as an auxiliary verb.

    Correct! 
    Wrong! 

    By!

    There are 23 helping verbs, listed here.

  10. Correct! 
    Wrong! 

    Since "I" is the subject, it should be placed immediately after the modifying clause ("Walking along"). Otherwise, it reads as if the cars are the ones doing the walking. Source

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