tahrey
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    • tahrey

      I think you’re reading too much into this, Johan. The British sense of humour seems as healthy and as wry as it’s ever been, as far as I can see. Sarcastic, satirical, non deferential, disrepectful, deeply self-deprecating, dry, sardonic, surreal, clever and sharp. Hicks loved playing the UK, because the audiences really got him… And we have a couple clues to the OP’s accent here. Their username is “Rhys W”. Their avatar is a red dragon, or a “ddraig goch” if you prefer, boyo. I doubt he’s posh. He’s a good old Welsh boy, a child of the vah-lees. One of the oddest but most brilliant things about our little group of islands is how diverse the accents and dialects are, at least as much so as in the USA. You have your poshos, beloved of royal-chasers and period drama types … your country yokels and pirates… various Londoners… all the different provincial cities and their major suburbs and surrounds (amongst which I count myself)… various Scots, various Irish (north and south, to boot), and indeed various Welsh. Diolch y Nos Da, bach.

    • tahrey

      How about 48 semi-modern reasons, then? This is a pop culture site after all. And everyone already knows about those other guys, they form the backbone of our industrial, innovative, scientific, architectural and entreprenurial heritage, but coverage of their lives and works has been done to death, and they’ve all been dead and gone a long time now. Whereas Jarvis Cocker is a musical hero and all-round top bloke, from Sheffield, who’s still alive, still working, that we can all look up to. Slightly. Because he’s tall, rather than because he’s a toff.

    • tahrey

      I count about five from the US, four from Japan, one from Canada, one from Denmark, one from Australia, one from France, and another from an indeterminate multinational company. The rest are domestic, and the mixture of all the above is decidedly British. You wouldn’t count Lasagne as a Russian dish just because it happened to include tomatoes, beef, durum wheat etc that happened to come from within its borders, would you? Just as the more common variety of this list doesn’t necessarily include 100% American items, but the mix is identifiably a USA one.

    • tahrey

      We didn’t, the multinational corporation that owned those brands did it. I’m still sore about Marathon changing to Snickers. What the hell is the american name even supposed to mean? I can see a chocolate, nougat, peanut and caramel bar giving you the energy to run for miles … but what’s the relation to quiet, snarky laughter? We stopped you taking our beloved Coco Pops away though. There was at least that.

    • tahrey

      Ella, I’m not sure what your point is. Things that happened in a year whose number starts “199” that you’re not old enough to personally remember arbitrarily don’t count as “nineties”? Erm. I’ve complained about enough BF articles in the past for having anachronistic entries, but only when it’s a matter of factual inaccuracy (e.g. stuff that’s obviously 60s/70s or 90s/2000s in an “Eighties!” article). We can’t expect the authors to go “oh! i’m picking up via the psychic brainwaves that one of our readers is too young to remember anything before about 1996! Better delete anything that refers to that 60% of the decade, then…”. People are older than you and younger than you, have different memories and reference points. I wouldn’t expect my younger cousins to recognise half of this other than as stuff that pops up in retrospectives, or my parents to care much for it other than “some thing our kids were into for a while”, just as they go crazy for things I either missed, or didn’t care much for. But *MY* late childhood and early adolescence was fully immersed in pretty much all of this, and it’d be nice of you to respect that as well. The “black cartoon” as you call it (could you not even be bothered to notice that it was what we call an “advertisement”, for a “drink” called “kia ora”?) didn’t do anything recognisably racist. It just happened include a character with dark skin in it. Oh my fucking lord, how terrible, in a country that’s majority white but does also have a significant black-carribean and mid-african immigrant population. (Never mind that I figure he’s supposed to be an aboriginal kiwi - and therefore a valid citizen of the commonwealth - given the drink’s name). A guy with dark skin who likes processed fruit juice, and doesn’t want to share it with cartoon birds who are somehow gangsters. Please explain to me how this is advocating slavery, promoting the idea of The Black Man As A Subhuman Race or whatever. BTW, black kids in the UK wouldn’t have known much more about rap in the early 90s either, it didn’t get as much penetration over here as in the states. The cooler kids of all races from the fairly multiethnic and well-connected parts of our inner cities would have been in tune with the odd NWA or Cypress Hill record and the like, maybe a bit of more commercial hip-hop, but it didn’t start taking hold in a big way until the decade was already established, and the whole “gangsta” thing only appeared on this side of the pond in the late 90s. If anything, they might have been more into jungle, ragga (/reggae/dancehall/etc), and other “urban” (now THERE’S an iffy “PC” term for you) parts of the more UK-(and NW-europe-)specific music scene. There was no internet remember, at least not until the latter half, and even then it wasn’t really what you’d call a multimedia experience, and BBSes weren’t anywhere near as popular here as in the more rural and separated parts of the world like the US and Scandinavia (unless you happened to be part of a cracking crew…). If you wanted access to some strange new foreign music that wasn’t in the usual stores, or indeed computer software or documentation, you had to be lucky enough to know a friend/FoaF who already had access to it and could tape it for you, or Copy That Floppy. If not, you were SoL. But as you can’t remember the earlier part of the decade, I guess we can’t expect you to realise how much more insular things were and how much less Americanised our culture was pre-broadband. You weren’t there, lady, YOU WE’RENT THERE. And thus it obviously didn’t actually happen. And neither did the 80s, or 70s, or early parts of the 20th century, or all human history before that.

    • tahrey

      Such things are in turn deceptive, and worrying. Third most populous it may be, but the second and first most populous outstrip it by miles, and there arealot of other nearly-as/significant-fraction-of nations besides. The US makes up something like 4.2% of total human population on earth. Which should make the third stat wholly terrifying-you have therefore something like 10x the global avereage defence spend. Why, fer Pete’s sake?! Incidentally, if we count the EU asarival (both are federal superstates, when viewed objectively; both Texas and France counting as smaller parts of the whole, both with deprecated border controls and no longer having their own currency, etc…), then you’re only second. That’s right, the liddle ol’ uropeen union hasagreater GDP than the USA. Which suggests that per capita, and per square mile, you’re not all that great shakes any more. (In fact, in terms of per-cap, you’re 6th). You do make upagood quarter of the world economic activity however, I’ll give you that. How much of it is high speed automated trading, though, who knows…