70 Years On, Images Of D-Day Blended With The Present

Photographer Peter Macdiarmid has blended images of the D-Day invasion of German-occupied Europe with photos of the locations as they look today.

1. Colleville sur Mer, France.

Peter Macdiarmid / Popperfoto / Getty

6 June 1944 marked the beginning of Operation Overlord; the invasion of German-occupied Europe during World War II.

2. Saint Aubin sur Mer, France.

Peter Macdiarmid / Lt. Handford/ IWM / Getty

3. Sainte Mere Eglise, France.

Peter Macdiarmid / Popperfoto / Getty

The initial invasion of Normandy was the largest ever amphibious assault in military history, known as D-Day.

4. Saint Lo, France.

Peter Macdiarmid / Galerie Bilderwelt / Getty

5. Bernieres sur Mer, France.

Peter Macdiarmid / Galerie Bilderwelt / Getty

The assault came just after midnight under the command of General Bernard Montgomery.

6. La Breche, France.

Peter Macdiarmid / Capt. J L Evans/ IWM / Getty

7. Moreton in Marsh, England.

Peter Macdiarmid / Frank Scherschel/Time & Life Pictures / Getty

Thousands of paratroops and glider-borne troops landed behind enemy lines on the beaches and mainland of Normandy.

8. Saint Marie du Mont, France.

Peter Macdiarmid / Galerie Bilderwelt / Getty

9. Weymouth, England.

Peter Macdiarmid / Galerie Bilderwelt / Getty

Around 7,000 ships and 11,000 aircraft were involved in the attack.

10. Weymouth Harbour, England.

Peter Macdiarmid / Galerie Bilderwelt / Getty

In total 75,215 British and Canadian troops and 57,500 U.S. troops were landed by sea on D-Day. Another 23,400 were landed by air.

11. Vierville sur Mer, France.

Peter Macdiarmid / MPI / Getty

King George VI broadcast a message on D-Day, calling for unified prayer during the battle: “I desire solemnly to call my people to prayer and dedication … At this historic moment surely not one of us is too busy, too young or too old to play a part in a nation-wide, perchance a world-wide, vigil of prayer as the great crusade sets forth.”

12. Trevieres, France.

Peter Macdiarmid / Galerie Bilderwelt / Getty

13. Basly, France.

Peter Macdiarmid / Galerie Bilderwelt / Getty

President Franklin D Roosevelt said in a news conference that the invasion did not mean the end of the war: “You don’t just walk to Berlin, and the sooner this country realises that the better.”

14. Pointe du Hoc, France.

Peter Macdiarmid / Galerie Bilderwelt / Getty

15. Bernieres-sur-Mere, France.

Peter Macdiarmid / Galerie Bilderwelt / Getty

D-Day marked the beginning of the end for the Germans, forcing the Axis powers to fight the Allies on two fronts.

16. Bernieres-sur-Mere, France.

Peter Macdiarmid / Galerie Bilderwelt / Getty

17. Caen, France.

Peter Macdiarmid / Galerie Bilderwelt / Getty

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Matt Tucker is the UK picture editor for BuzzFeed and is based in London.
 
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