kaloramakid
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    • kaloramakid

      This is still a thing in 2014? Oh wait, we’re all human, so of course to some degree we notice our intrinsic differences when spending time with people who are culturally different.  What I don’t understand is this: can we please not demonize an institution for the dearth of interest in a particular career path in the African American community? A Buzzfeed like this,and possibly the project it mentions don’t go far enough to investigate and explain whether there is a systemic problem causing the lack of diversity, or as mentioned, whether it truly boils down to a dearth of qualified black applicants.  I’m not dismissing that it could truly be a strange - or even hard - experience for the ‘33’. To draw a high acheiving, well paid parallel, I would ask if the project’s producers would be interested in asking white men on NBA basketball teams if they feel this way. Hell, go see if Jeremy Lin feels this way. For that matter, how many Asians and Indians and Latinos are enrolled at UCLA Law? That would have been a credible data point to have mentioned. Being black in America unquestionably entails dealing with a stigma towards personal success both within black communities and outside of them. Our president has made as much very clear in his own story. But I feel like its disingenuous to spend so much time recounting the same narrative over and over without examining whether people from other racial communities are dealing with similar struggles. Isn’t it a bit ridiculous in our melting pot America to make something - anything - solely about being black in a white man’s world? Can we be honest with ourselves and agree that such a reality is crumbling away with each new generation? To revisit this wherever it occurs is a helpful reminder I suppose, but the breast-beating, woe-is-me tone doesn’t do much to evoke empathy, nor does it do much to move us forward, and past this point to where we can just accept ourselves, whatever color we are, in the place we stand and regardless of the ratio there, of human beings that share one’s own color.