Are You Holy Enough To Receive Communion?

Catholics: Before going to Mass, take this quiz to avoid repeating the mistakes of Joe Biden and Nancy Pelosi.

Chris Ritter
  1. 1. Are you Catholic?
    1. Yes
    2. No
  2. 2. Have you been baptized in the Catholic Church?
    Wikimedia Commons
    1. Yes
    2. No
  3. 3. Do you believe that the bread and wine of the Eucharist disappear at the moment of consecration during Mass and LITERALLY become the body and blood of Jesus Christ?
    1. Yes
    2. No
  4. 4. Barring serious illness or circumstances beyond your control, have you chosen to skip Sunday Mass since the last time you received Communion?
    Wikimedia Commons / Via commons.wikimedia.org
    1. Yes
    2. No
  5. 5. Have you obtained an abortion or helped someone obtain an abortion?
    1. Yes
    2. No
  6. 6. Have you chosen to use drugs or abuse alcohol to the point of drunkenness?
    Mario Tama / Getty Images
    1. Yes
    2. No
  7. 7. Have you deliberately killed, raped or tortured another person?
    1. Yes
    2. No
  8. 8. Do you masturbate and/or view pornography?
    Shutterstock
    1. Yes
    2. No
  9. 9. Have you had sex with someone to whom you are not married?
    Shutterstock
    1. Yes
    2. No
  10. 10. Have you engaged in oral or anal sex?
    Shutterstock
    1. Yes
    2. No
  11. 11. Do you use contraception of any form?
    Shutterstock
    1. Yes
    2. No
  12. 12. Do you support same-sex marriage even though you know that the Church opposes it?
    Shutterstock
    1. Yes
    2. No
  13. 13. Are you currently living with a romantic partner that you're not married to?
    Shutterstock
    1. Yes
    2. No
  14. 14. Do you support the death penalty?
    California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation / Via en.wikipedia.org
    1. Yes
    2. No
    3. My stance on the death penalty does not affect my ability to receive communion.
  15. 15. Do you support legislation guaranteeing women the ability to have an abortion or advocate for organizations that provide abortions?
    Getty Images
    1. Yes
    2. No
  16. 16. Have you married in the Catholic Church, obtained a divorce and then remarried without a decree of annulment from the Church?
    1. Yes
    2. No
  17. 17. Do you support embryonic stem-cell research?
    1. Yes
    2. No
  18. 18. Have you committed tax evasion or attempted to avoid paying taxes?
    1. Yes
    2. No
  19. 19. Have you used a surrogate to carry a child to term, or have you carried a child as a surrogate mother?
    Shutterstock
    1. Yes
    2. No
  20. 20. Have you willfully wished serious harm on another person?
    1. Yes
    2. No
  21. 21. Have you conceived a child or helped conceive a child through in vitro fertilization or artificial insemination?
    Shutterstock
    1. Yes
    2. No
  22. 22. If you are an employer, do you pay your employees a just wage?
    1. Yes
    2. No
  23. 23. Have you lied while under oath or committed perjury?
    Shutterstock
    1. Yes
    2. No
  24. 24. Have you eaten anything in the past hour?
    Shutterstock
    1. Yes
    2. No

3. So that’s it? If I passed this quiz, I can receive Communion?


Not exactly. The Church Code of Canon Law says that those who “have been excommunicated or interdicted after the imposition or declaration of the penalty and others obstinately persevering in manifest grave sin” are not to receive Communion and there are a LOT of grave (or mortal) sins. Catholics are supposed to examine their conscience and consult a priest.

Catechism of the Catholic Church 1857: “For a sin to be mortal, three conditions must together be met: “Mortal sin is sin whose object is grave matter and which is also committed with full knowledge and deliberate consent.

4. What does the Church say will happen if I receive Communion anyway?


Catechism of the Catholic Church 1385:

To respond to this invitation [to the Eucharist] we must prepare ourselves for so great and so holy a moment. St. Paul urges us to examine our conscience: “Whoever, therefore, eats the bread or drinks the cup of the Lord in an unworthy manner will be guilty of profaning the body and blood of the Lord. Let a man examine himself, and so eat of the bread and drink of the cup. For any one who eats and drinks without discerning the body eats and drinks judgment upon himself.” Anyone conscious of a grave sin must receive the sacrament of Reconciliation before coming to communion.

Code of Canon Law 916:

A person who is conscious of grave sin is not to celebrate Mass or receive the body of the Lord without previous sacramental confession unless there is a grave reason and there is no opportunity to confess; in this case the person is to remember the obligation to make an act of perfect contrition which includes the resolution of confessing as soon as possible.

TL;DR: It’s a mortal sin, but only if you knowingly receive communion with the full understanding that you shouldn’t be participating.

6. What about freedom of conscience? Aren’t I free to make up my own mind about things like abortion and same-sex marriage?


Some Catholic commentators assert that a well-formed conscience and official Catholic teaching may come to opposite conclusions in moral matters. This opinion directly contradicts the Catechism, paragraph 2039: “Personal conscience and reason should not be set in opposition to the moral law or the Magisterium of the Church.” A Catholic simply cannot claim to have a well-formed and well-informed conscience if he is ignorant of, misunderstands, or rejects outright God’s law and thus commits acts that the Church considers gravely disordered.

Catholic Answers Magazine/Leon J. Suprenant / Via catholic.com

7. Why are Catholics supposed to obey everything the Church says?


Why should we obey these teachings of the Church? Where does the Church get its authority? From Jesus. In Matthew 16:18-19, Jesus made Peter the head of his Church — the first Pope. He gave Peter and the Church “the keys to the kingdom of heaven”:

“I say to you, you are Peter, and upon this rock I will build my church, and the gates of hell shall not prevail against it. I will give you the keys to the kingdom of heaven. Whatever you bind on earth shall be bound in heaven; and whatever you loose on earth shall be loosed in heaven.”

The Church’s authority in faith and morals is absolute because Christ’s authority is absolute.

Catholic Education Resource Center / Via catholiceducation.org

8. Polls say that many American Catholics support same-sex marriage, contraception and other things on this list. Shouldn’t someone stop them from receiving Communion?


Technically, the people themselves should refrain from receiving Communion if they’re aware that their beliefs render them unable to receive the Eucharist in a state of grace.

Priests can only deny Communion to sinners whose sins are publicly known and politicians with professed beliefs contrary to Catholic teaching certainly fall into that category, as do notorious criminals or couples openly living together out of wedlock. St. Thomas Aquinas explains this in his Summa Theologica:

A distinction must be made among sinners: some are secret; others are notorious, either from evidence of the fact, as public usurers, or public robbers, or from being denounced as evil men by some ecclesiastical or civil tribunal. Therefore Holy Communion ought not to be given to open sinners when they ask for it… But if they be not open sinners, but occult, the Holy Communion should not be denied them if they ask for it. For since every Christian, from the fact that he is baptized, is admitted to the Lord’s table, he may not be robbed of his right, except from some open cause.

9. Just realize that you might need to head to Confession before going to Mass on Easter Sunday? Me too. Here are some happy Catholic GIFs.

Check out more articles on BuzzFeed.com!

Facebook Conversations
          
    Hot Buzz

    What’s The Most Embarrassing Thing That Ever Happened To You At A Wedding?

    collection

    What’s The Biggest Lie You’ve Ever Told?

    collection
    Now Buzzing