• 1. Avocado

    Root language: Nahuatl
    Region: Mexico
    From the word huacatl meaning “testicle.”
    via

  • 2. Barbecue

    Root language: Arawakan
    Region: South America
    From the word barbakoa meaning “framework of sticks.”
    via

  • 3. Bayou

    Root language: Choctaw
    From the word bayuk meaning “creek, river.”
    via

  • 4. Cannibal

    Root language: Cariban
    From the word “karípona” meaning “person.” Early Spanish explorers believed that the Caribs ate people.

  • 5. Canoe

    Root language: Arawakan Taino
    From the word “canoa.” via

  • 6. Caribou

    Root language: Algonquin
    From the word qalipu meaning “snow shoveler.”
    Via

  • 7. Cashew

    Root language: Tupi Guaraní
    From the word acaîu
    via

  • 8. Cayenne

    Root language: Tupi Guaraní
    From the word: kyinha
    via

  • 9. Chili

    Root language: Nahuatl
    From the word ch+lli
    via

  • 10. Chipmunk

    Root language: Algonquin
    Originally “chitmunk,” from the Odawa word jidmoonh meaning “red squirrel.”
    via

  • 11. Chocolate

    Root language: Nahuatl
    Comes from the words xococ -“bitter”, and tl - “water.”
    In its traditional form, chocolate was primarily served as an unsweetened drink.
    via

  • 12. Cocoa

    Root language: Nahuatl
    From the word cacahuatl.
    via

  • 13. Condor

    Root language: Quechua
    From the word kuntur
    via

  • 14. Cougar

    Root language: Tupi Guaraní
    A corruption of guaçu ara.
    Via

  • 15. Coyote

    Root language: Nahuatl
    From the word coyMtl
    Via

  • 16. Guacamole

    Root language: Nahuatl
    From huacamMlli meaning “avocado sauce.”
    Via

  • 17. Hammock

    Root language: Arawakan
    From Taino via Spanish hamaca.
    Via

  • 18. Hickory

    Root language: Algonquin-Powhatan
    From pocohiquara meaning “milky drink made with hickory nuts.” Today hickory can refer to the tree, the finished wood, the nuts, or even the flavor.

  • 19. Hooch

    Root language: Tlingit
    A shortened form of Hoochinoo, from the word xutsnuuwú, originally the name of a village meaning “brown bear fort.

  • 20. Hurricane

    Root language: Arawakan - Taino
    From the word hurakán.
    Via

  • 21. Husky

    Root language: Algonquin
    A variant of the word Eskimo from the Innu language word aiachkimeou.
    Via

  • 22. Iguana

    Root language: Arawakan
    From the word iwana
    Via

  • 23. Jaguar

    Root language: Tupi Guaraní
    From the word jaÈwar
    Via

  • 24. Jerky

    Root language: Quechua
    From the word ch’arki
    Via

  • 25. Kayak

    Root languages: Eskimo-Aleut
    From the word qajaq.
    Via

  • 26. Llama

    Root language: Quechua
    Via

  • 27. Manatee

    Root language: Cariban
    From a word meaning “woman’s breast.”

  • 28. Moose

    Root language: Algonquin
    From Eastern Abenaki moz
    via

  • 29. Ocelot

    Root language: Nahuatl
    From a href= oclMtl.

  • 30. Opossum

    Root language: Algonquin
    From the Powhatan word aposoum meaning, “white dog-like animal.”

  • 31. Pecan

    Root language: Algonquin
    From the Illinois word pakani.
    Via

  • 32. Petunia

    Root language: Tupi Guaraní
    From the word petun meaning “smoke.”
    Via

  • 33. Potato

    Root language: Arawakan
    Via the Haitian Carib word batata.
    Via

  • 34. Puma

    Root language: Quechua
    Via

  • 35. Raccoon

    Root language: Algonquin
    From the word arahkun.
    Via

  • 36. Skunk

    Root language: Algonquin
    From the Massachusett word squnck meaning “urine fox.”
    Via

  • 37. Squash

    Root language: Algonquin
    From the Narragansett word askútasquash.
    Via

  • 38. Tapioca

    Root language: Tupi Guaraní
    From a word meaning “juice squeezed out” the word is now applied to the root starch and the pudding made from it.
    Via

  • 39. Toboggan

    Root language: Algonquin
    From Míkmaq word topaaqan meaning “to drag with a cord.” Today the word primarily refers to the sled throughout most of the United States. However, in some southern states where it doesn’t snow enough for sledding, the word has become a regional slang for the type of hat one would wear in cold weather, such as a knit stocking cap.  Via

  • 40. Toucan

    Root language: TupiGuaraní
    Via

  • 41. Tomato

    Root language: Nahuatl
    From the word tomatl.
    Via

  • 42. Woodchuck

    Root language: Algonquin
    A corruption of the word ockqutchaun.
    Via