• This sample barcode — from Kellogg’s Bear Naked Granola — is one example that plays it safe but adds a touch of playfulness. But it helps to show off the barcode ‘rules’: The barcode needs to be at least a half inch high, blank space is needed on either side and certain colors like red, orange and yellow can’t be used. Outside of that, everything should pretty much be fair game.

  • This example, from Brooklyn brewer Sixpoint, is a bit more daring. It features a barcode that’s been transformed into a cityscape with the Statue of Liberty. But it still follows the basic rules of a scannable barcode.

  • Not only does Verdi top their package of olives with barcode with an olive tree, they also have a scannable mobile phone code as a link to their website.

  • This cityscape barcode from Dane Reade isn’t usable — but it isn’t meant to be. It’s simply a unique design element.

  • There are design companies out there that are willing to get a bit more creative with barcodes. This waterfall design from Tokyo ad firm Design Barcodes, Inc. is just one of their more creative designs.

  • This mixer from New Jersey design firm Vanity shows off what they can do with a boring old bar code.

  • Another barcode from Tokyo - this time a surfer.

  • And a yummy ice cream sandwich from Vanity.

  • More on the Barcode Renaissance, including video, at The BuzzBrewery