• 1. The Tin Can

    1. The Tin Can

    British merchant Peter Durand made a lasting impact on food preservation with his 1810 patenting of the tin can.

  • 2. The Lawn Mower

  • The first patent for a mechanical lawn mower described as a "Machine for mowing lawns, etc." was ...

    The first patent for a mechanical lawn mower described as a “Machine for mowing lawns, etc.” was granted on August 31, 1830 to engineer Edwin Beard Budding (1795-1846) from Stroud, Gloucestershire, England.

  • 3. World Wide Web

    3. World Wide Web

  • Born in London, Tim Berners-Lee was the man leading the development of the World Wide Web, the de...

    Born in London, Tim Berners-Lee was the man leading the development of the World Wide Web, the defining of HTML (hypertext markup language) used to create web pages, HTTP (HyperText Transfer Protocol) and URLs (Universal Resource Locators). All of those developments took place between 1989 and 1991.

  • 4. The Television

  • Television pioneer John Logie Baird created the first televised pictures of objects in motion (19...

    Television pioneer John Logie Baird created the first televised pictures of objects in motion (1924), the first televised human face (1925) and a year later he televised the first moving object image at the Royal Institution in London. His 1928 trans-atlantic transmission of the image of a human face was a broadcasting milestone. Color television (1928), stereoscopic television and television by infra-red light were all demonstrated by Baird before 1930.

  • 5. The Sewing Machine

    5. The Sewing Machine

  • The first patent connected to mechanical sewing was a 1755 British patent issued to German-born C...

    The first patent connected to mechanical sewing was a 1755 British patent issued to German-born Charles Weisenthal. Weisenthal was issued a patent for a needle that was designed for a machine, however, the patent did not describe the rest of the machine (if one existed).

  • 6. The Submarine

    6. The Submarine

  • In 1578 Englishman William Bourne, a former Royal Navy gunner, designed a completely enclosed boa...

    In 1578 Englishman William Bourne, a former Royal Navy gunner, designed a completely enclosed boat that could be submerged and rowed beneath the surface. His creation was a wooden framework bound in waterproofed leather. It was to be submerged by using hand vises to contract the sides and decrease the volume.

  • 7. The Corkscrew

    7. The Corkscrew

    German Carl Wienke invented a single lever waiter’s type corkscrew called the ‘Butler’s Friend’. Wienke was granted a German patent (Lever Corkscrew Patent DRP 20815) on May 26, 1882. He was granted a British patent (Improvement in Lever Corkscrews No. 2,022) on April 20, 1883 and a French patent (No. 155314) on May 7, 1883.

  • 8. The Telephone

    8. The Telephone

  • In the 1870s, inventors Elisha Gray and Alexander Graham Bell, who was born in Scotland, both ind...

    In the 1870s, inventors Elisha Gray and Alexander Graham Bell, who was born in Scotland, both independently designed devices that could transmit speech electrically. Both men rushed their respective designs to the patent office within hours of each other, and Alexander Graham Bell patented his telephone first. Gray and Bell entered into a famous legal battle over the invention of the telephone, which Bell won.

  • 9. The Fax Machine

  • The first fax machine was invented by Scottish mechanic and inventor Alexander Bain. In 1843, Ale...

    The first fax machine was invented by Scottish mechanic and inventor Alexander Bain. In 1843, Alexander Bain received a British patent for improvements in producing and regulating electric currents and improvements in timepieces and in electric printing and signal telegraphs, in laymen’s terms a fax machine.

  • 10. Catseyes

    10. Catseyes

  • In 1934, Percy Shaw patented Catseye road studs. Catseyes, the road reflectors which help drivers...

    In 1934, Percy Shaw patented Catseye road studs. Catseyes, the road reflectors which help drivers see the road in the fog or at night, were patented by Englishman Percy Shaw in 1934. Catseyes were introduced on British roads 13 years later.