10 Meat Terms You Never Understood… Until Now

For those of us who’ve always been confused when reading recipes and steakhouse menus! We’re all a little more confident in our cooking and dining, thanks to Beef. It’s What’s For Dinner.

1. “Braise”

Braising is a combination cooking process. First, the meat is browned on all sides. Then, liquid is added, and the mixture simmers slowly to finish. This method is great for tenderizing tough cuts of meat.

2. “Cube Meat”

Any meat that has been cut into uniform pieces. Also called kabobs or brochettes.

3. “Denude”

Denuding is the process of removing all surface fat. This is also referred to as “peeling.”

4. “Deglaze”

 

Deglazing a pan is the technique of using liquid to loosen the caramelized bits of food and drippings at the bottom of the pan after cooking meat. Turn the heat up high, pour in some stock, wine, or simply water, and scrape the pan with a wooden spoon or spatula. The resulting liquid makes an excellent base for a sauce or gravy!

5. “Dry Heat Cooking”

It’s exactly what it sounds like! Cooking methods that are inherently dry, like grilling, roasting, broiling, and skillet cooking. This method works best with tender cuts of meat.

6. “Marinade”

A marinade is a liquid solution, generally including a variety of ingredients like flavored vinegars, prepared salad dressings, and citrus. Marinades help tenderize less tender cuts of beef.

7. “Rub”

A rub is a dry mixture of spices and herbs applied to flavor the meat.

8. “Roast”

This method involves cooking on a rack, usually in an oven, without added liquid. For best results, do not add water or cover the pan. Roasting locks in the natural juices to provide a crispy exterior and juicy interior. Some of the most popular cuts sold as roasts include tenderloin, ribeye, sirloin, tri-tip, bottom round, and top round.

9. “Sear”

Searing refers to browning the surface of the meat by briefly applying intense heat. Brown over medium heat. This technique adds flavor to the beef that is not intrinsic to it.

10. “Temperature”

Temperature gauges how thoroughly cooked a cut of meat is based on the color, juiciness, and internal temperature when cooked. For steaks and roasts, the USDA recommends an internal temperature of 145° F and a rest time of at least three minutes.

And now that you’re versed in meat terminology, it’s time to cook up some beef.


Beef. It’s What’s For Dinner. Learn more about beef and discover new recipes!

All images courtesy of The Beef Checkoff.

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