When Sarah Palin Supported Amnesty

Her 2008 support for “a path to citizenship for undocumented immigrants” would seemingly fall under the definition she has for amnesty today. posted on

Former Gov. of Alaska Sarah Palin speaks during the Faith and Freedom Coalition Road to Majority 2013 conference, Saturday, June 15, 2013, in Washington. Carolyn Kaster / AP

Former vice presidential candidate and Alaska Governor Sarah Palin has been a vocal critic of Republicans, Democrats, and President Obama alike on immigration reform, denouncing efforts to create a pathway to citizenship for millions of undocumented workers — despite her previous support for just such a pathway.

Palin’s switch from supporter of a citizenship pathway for the 11 million undocumented workers to ardent opponent has been on full display in recent days and weeks.

“A matter of a lack principle and respect for the rule of law,” Palin said about Republicans supporting immigration reform Saturday on Fox News. “This was an absolute betrayal of working-class Americans who do respect the rule of law and legal immigrants who have come here and stood in line, and paid their dues if you will, and become new Americans.”

“It’s an absolute betrayal of the will of the people and the rule of the law,” she added.

“You’ve just abandoned the Reagan Democrats with this amnesty bill,” Palin recently wrote on her Facebook page. “You disrespect Hispanics with your assumption that they desire ignoring the rule of law.”

“Hope it was worth 30 pieces of silver,” she said of Marco Rubio of getting a call from Obama. (Rubio wasn’t available, so never spoke to Obama.)

For all of Palin’s recent tough rhetoric on immigration, the former governor of Alaska expressed support for immigration reform during the 2008 presidential campaign according to video and a transcript an October 2008 interview with the Spanish-language channel Univision. The type of immigration reform Palin supported would surely fall under her current definition of “amnesty.”

“There is no way that in the U.S. we would round up every illegal immigrant — there are about 12 million of the illegal immigrants — not only economically is that just an impossibility but that’s not a humane way anyway to deal with the issue that we face with illegal immigration,” Palin said.

When asked if she supported “a path to citizenship for undocumented immigrants,” Palin responded that she did.

“I do because I understand why people would want to be in America. To seek the safety and prosperity, the opportunities, the health that is here,” Palin said. “It is so important that yes, people follow the rules so that people can be treated equally and fairly in this country.”

Palin said that while she did not support full “amnesty,” she supported the pathway to citizenship but that undocumented workers would have to wait behind legal immigrants, as the Senate bill recently passed also states.

“No, I do not. I do not. Not total amnesty. You know, people have got to follow the rules. They’ve got to follow the bar, and we have got to make sure that there is equal opportunity and those who are here legally should be first in line for services being provided and those opportunities that this great country provides,” Palin said.

The video of the interview is posted below; however, it is dubbed over in Spanish. A transcript is attached.

As governor, how do you deal with them? Do you think they all should be deported?

There is no way that in the US we would roundup every illegal immigrant there are about 12 million of the illegal immigrants not only economically is that just an impossibility but that’s not a humane way anyway to deal with the issue that we face with illegal immigration.

Do you then favor an amnesty for the 12 or 13 million undocumented immigrants?

No, I do not. I do not. Not total amnesty. You know, people have got to follow the rules. They’ve got to follow the bar, and we have got to make sure that there is equal opportunity and those who are here legally should be first in line for services being provided and those opportunities that this great country provides.

To clarify, so you support a path to citizenship for undocumented immigrants?

I do because I understand why people would want to be in America. To seek the safety and prosperity, the opportunities, the health that is here. It is so important that yes, people follow the rules so that people can be treated equally and fairly in this country.

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