The Last Two Cases Of Rand Paul Plagiarism That We Are Going To Post

Another section of the senator’s book appears to be copied from a think tank scholar.

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Another section of Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul’s 2012 book Government Bullies appears to be plagiarized from an article by a think tank scholar, as well as a section of a speech copied from a conservative chain email.

As BuzzFeed previously reported, parts of the book were plagiarized from a variety of sources, including the Heritage Foundation, Cato Institute and a Forbes article.

As was the case with other instances, Paul includes a link to the work in his book’s footnotes, but does not note that the language itself was taken from the source.

Here’s Cato scholar Timothy Sandefur of the Pacific Legal Foundation in Regulation Magazine in an article on wetlands.

Congress enacts broadly worded statutes threatening devastating penalties for vaguely worded violations—and leaves administrative officials the discretion to fill in the details.

And here’s how Paul wrote it:

Congress enacts broadly worded statutes threatening devastating penalties for vaguely worded violations— and leaves administrative officials to then muddy the law through drawn-out litigation with the discretion to fill in the details.

Here’s how a line appeared in a conservative chain email dating back to 2003 about a billion dollars:

A billion seconds ago it was 1959. A billion minutes ago Jesus was alive. A billion hours ago our ancestors were living in the Stone Age. A billion days ago no-one walked on the earth on two feet. A billion dollars ago was only 8 hours and 20 minutes.

Here’s how Paul delivered it in floor remarks on Social Security:

A billion seconds, ago I was in high school. A billion minutes ago, Jesus was alive. A billion hours ago, we were in the Stone Age. But a billion dollars ago at the rate the government spends it, was only a few minutes ago.

The book’s publisher, Center Street, said Tuesday it will update future printings to include attributions to the Heritage Foundation and Cato Institute.

“We are informed that the material used from the Heritage Foundation and the Cato Institute was used with permission, which was indicated in the source notes at the end of the book,” said Rolf Zettersten, the senior vice president and publisher of Center Street. “To avoid any future misunderstanding, future printings will include the attribution in the narrative.”

The Kentucky senator’s office said this week they will implement a new “approval process” to ensure proper citation in the future.

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